Opioid Prescribing Various Among US Counties

 

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Check out this map from the CDC which shows which counties in 2015 had high opioid prescribing.  The CDC found similar characteristics amongst these counties such as having a higher percent of white residents, more dentists and primary care providers, more people who were uninsured or unemployed.

By Julia Watson

Years of Potential Life Lost Rate (2011 to 2013)

Check out this map that shows the years of potential life lost rate from years 2011 to 2013. The years of potential life lost rate, also known as premature mortality rate, measures the frequency in which people are dying. From the map we can see a pronounced cluster of states darkly shaded (Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia) indicating a large proportion of counties within these states had a high rate of premature deaths. In other words people who lived within these counties were dying at an early age. In contrast we can see counties within states such as, Maine, Road Island, Vermont are lightly shaded yellow/orange, indicating people who lived within these counties were dying at an older age.

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For more information click here

By Julia Watson

Chlamydia Rate By County 2013

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) chlamydia is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the U.S. [1] largely affecting men and women between the ages of 20 to 24. If untreated chlamydia can cause detrimental damage to a women’s reproductive system. [2]

Check out this map which shows the incidence of chlamydia by US counties in 2013 per 100,000 population. From the map, we can see most of states have a couple counties that are shaded dark indicating a high rate of newly diagnosed cases. Overall, we can see most counties have newly diagnosed causes of chlamydia.

MOTD7_12_17_ChlamydiaRate2013For more information click here.

By Julia Watson

 

Lung Cancer Mortality Rates- 4 maps

These four maps shown in the slide below show the Lung Cancer mortality rate per 100,000 people based on gender and race. Scroll through the maps to see how each one compares. The information is from CDC records and we transferred the data into our Mappler maps.

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The Most Distinctive Causes of Death by State, 2001-2010

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This map put out by the CDC, shows the most distinctive causes of death in the United States. This map is colored coded to be easier to read and as you can see the key below the map shows what the cause of death is. There are interesting limitations to keep in mind while looking at the map. On the CDC site they explain “A limitation of this map is that it depicts only 1 distinctive cause of death for each state. All of these were significantly higher than the national rate, but there were many others also significantly higher than the national rate that were not mapped. The map is also predisposed to showing rare causes of death — for 22 of the states, the total number of deaths mapped was under 100. Using broader cause-of-death categories or requiring a higher threshold for the number of deaths would result in a different map. These limitations are characteristic of maps generally and are why these maps are best regarded as snapshots and not comprehensive statistical summaries” (cdc.gov). To take a closer look at the map and read the background of the project go to cdc.gov

all information from cdc.gov. click here to see the site. contact gis@vertices.com.

CDC Stroke Death Rate

This CDC map displays stroke death rates from 2011-2013 in adults ages sixty-five and older. The data is taken from the National Vital Statistics System and the National Center for Health Statistics. This particular map shows all ethnic groups, and if you visit the site you can see other maps that focus on one ethnicity. Go to cdc.gov to see all the maps and to view more information !

 

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all information for this post from cdc.gov. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com.