How Some States Are Responding To The Opioid Epidemic

Although President Donald Trump recently declared the opioid crisis a national epidemic some states have already been working towards a solution to the crisis such as, making the drug naloxone, which reverses opioid overdoses, freely available. Check out this clip from NPR which describes how some states responding to the opioid crisis.
https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542836709/542867098
For more information click here.

By Julia Watson.

President Declares The Opioid Crisis A National Emergency

It is well known that the US currently faces an opioid epidemic and according to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) since 1999 the rate of overdose death related to opioid, including both heroin and prescription drugs, has quadrupled. In addition to the negative health effects the epidemic has also had economic impacts on the health care system with nearly 55 billion dollars being spent a year on health and social cost related to prescription opioid abuse [1].

Health care providers have been working together to address the epidemic and recently President Donald Trump declared the the opioid crisis a national emergency. Check out the clip below and to read more click here.

By Julia Watson

Average Heat Wave Days By County 2010

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Check out this map that shows the average heat wave days from May to September by county for year 2010. A heat wave is known as a prolonged period of abnormally hot weather. From the map we can see many southern, midwest and northeastern states had a higher average in heat wave days indicated by the darker shading. For instance, Louisiana is mostly shaded dark, indicating the vast majority of the counties had a high average of heat wave days ranging from 26.01 to 62.00 days. In contrast, many counties within the western state had a low average of heat wave days indicated by the yellow/yellow-orange shading.

By Julia Watson

Percent of Severe Housing Problems By County (2008 to 2012)

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Today’s map of the day shows the percent of severe housing problems by county for years 2008 to 2012. Severe housing problems was defined as households with at least 1 of 4 housing problems including: overcrowding, high housing cost, or lack of kitchen or plumbing facilities. From the map we can see a large portion of counties within Alaska and some western states, such as California, Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington have a higher percentage of severe housing problems indicated by the dark shaded counties compared to counties within other regions, such as the Midwest.

By Julia Watson

Percent Alcohol-impaired Driving Dealths By County ( 2010 to 2014)

Check out this map that shows the percent alcohol-impaired driving deaths by county for years 2010 to 2014. From the map we can see the driving deaths with alcohol universally affects all states. We can see some Midwestern and Northwestern states have a large portion of counties with a higher percent of driving deaths with alcohol impairment with ranging between 45 – 100%  indicated by the darker shaded counties.

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By Julia Watson

Preventable Hospital Stay Rate By County 2013

Ambulatory-care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are conditions where effective community care and management can help prevent the need for hospital admission. The map below shows the rate of hospital stays for ACSCs per 1,000 Medicare enrollees. From the map we can see a large portion of counties within western states had a lower ACSCs rate indicated by the yellow/light orange shading compared to counties within various southern states who had higher rates, indicated by the darker shaded counties. Map like this allow health providers to then look deeper into why these rates vary. For instance, since ACSC’s are medical problems that are potentially preventable, such as hypertension, health care providers might hypothesize counties with higher rates are lacking health care providers.

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By Julia Watson

 

Opioid Prescribing Various Among US Counties

 

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Check out this map from the CDC which shows which counties in 2015 had high opioid prescribing.  The CDC found similar characteristics amongst these counties such as having a higher percent of white residents, more dentists and primary care providers, more people who were uninsured or unemployed.

By Julia Watson