How GIS has changed our world

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Earth Day Community Map!

Our Vertices team created an Earth Day map so everyone and anyone can share what they think makes this planet beautiful! All you have to do is go outside and snap a picture of what you think makes this planet awesome and upload it on the site.

Today on Earth Day, log onto earthdaymap.com from your phone or computer as a guest or create an account. Input your location, choose the category that best represents your photo, upload the picture (example: tree, flower, animal, insect, sunset, etc.), then add a short comment about your data. The time and date will be automatically added in by our mapping program Mappler!

Let’s see how many data points around the US and even the world we can map. So go outside and share your view of this amazing planet!

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National Institute on Minority Health & Health Disparities- Future Funding Announcement

“The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) intends to promote the first of several planned NIMHD Precision Medicine initiatives by publishing a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to solicit applications for new Transdisciplinary Collaborative Centers (TCCs) for health disparities research focused on examining the potential for integrative precision medicine approaches to help improve minority health and reduce or eliminate health disparities. This Notice is being provided to allow potential applicants sufficient time to develop meaningful collaborations and responsive projects. This new TCC FOA is expected to be published in the spring of 2015 with an expected application due date in late summer 2015. The FOA will use the U54 cooperative agreement award activity code.” (grants.nih.gov)

  • For more information on this future grant opportunity click here
  • Contact Nishadi Rajapakse for more information & help- Nishadi Rajapakse, PhD, MHS National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) Telephone: 301-496-4338 Email: chandima.rajapakse@nih.gov

Everydayhealth.com Flu Map

EverydayHealth.com posted a flu map of the United States to show flu-risk trends and predictions. You can either click on your state and county or enter your zip code to see how your area rates. The map is color coded with mild risk and predictions colored white, moving to moderate risk with a turquoise color, then leading to severe with pinks and then red as the most dangerous.

Screen shot 2015-03-30 at 11.51.34 AM“Our methodology takes into account current and historical CDC data, rising and falling interest in flu on social media and in online searches, and local and regional weather information. The flu map predicts flu severity county by county across the United States so you can plan ahead and take precautions to avoid the flu – both at home and in places where you plan to travel” (everydayhealth.com)

Go and check out the map by Everyday Health!

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com

New Jersey Pothole Map

After all of this bad weather we have had here in New Jersey, the roads are a mess with potholes. To help drivers along their route, this map will point out all the pothole hazards on the road, with the help of the public. PotholeMapping.com is a grassroots community mapping initiative by Justin E. Auciello(@auciello) and Dr. Wansoo Im. Anyone can contribute pothole location information from an Apple or Android device using the site, or from your computer. Just login under one-time guest, select Add Data, distinguish the pothole’s location by either clicking my location or find address, then fill in the information about the pothole in each category that has an asterisk. Additional comments and your name can also be added, and the time and date of your data will automatically be determined by Mappler. Once you are done adding in all of the information click submit, and your data point will appear on the map!

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Visit the site and add any potholes that you see. Community participation leads to community awareness !

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com

Chasing Ice

I’ve posted a few things about changing temperatures and human impact consequences, so I wanted to share a documentary that I recently saw called Chasing Ice. This documentary follows environmental photographer James Balog, on his passionate project to give the public visual evidence of global warming. Balog and his team decided to focus on melting glaciers, and the drastic changes that are adding to sea level rise. With the ongoing controversy on the truth of global warming, Balog knew that people needed evidence that they could see with their own eyes. Balog and team of scientists, EIS engineers, and photo assistants, traveled to Greenland, Iceland, and Alaska capturing otherwise never could be seen glacial calving. They set up timer cameras to capture images of glacier melting over a few month period and created a time-lapse video which gave the public a real look into how temperature is effecting these areas. Even though these places seem and are so far away, our daily choices effect them, and in turn will effect us in the future. Be sure to check out the documentary, which can be found on Netflix! Our impact does effect the environment, and now the argument of “not seeing” our effects, can in fact be seen and trust me it will shock you.

Screen shot 2015-03-09 at 3.57.24 PMScreen shot 2015-03-09 at 4.04.25 PMWatch the trailer here! Click here to visit the Chasing Ice website!

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Contact us at gis@vertices.com.

Copper River Watershed’s Salmon Blitz Project

Salmon Blitz was developed in 2013 to engage citizen scientists in documenting salmon habitat in the Copper River watershed.  Volunteers assist in the field and collect the data necessary to nominate stream and lake habitat for listing in the State of Alaska’s Anadromous Waters Catalog (copperriver.org)

For the protection of salmon, trout, and other anadromous fish, and for educational purposes, the CRW worked with Vertices and developed a personalized mapping tool that the community can use. Through Mappler, the community visiting the CRW in Cordova, Alaska, can now help monitor the fish population just by observing and inputting a small but of information using your phone.

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The information that you input consists of your name, about how many fish you saw, where you saw them, date, time, weather conditions, any additional information you know about the fish, what the habitat looks like, and any other observations you want to share. So go ahead and visit the CRW, learn something, and share it!

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com

Marine Debris in Cordova Alaska

A new project has been set up for marine debris mapping in Cordova, Alaska. This is a community map which means that anyone in the area who see debris on the land or water can photograph, pin-point, and share with anyone through the site. Using Mappler, you just add the location you found the debris and then choose what kind of debris it is from the long list of options (there is also an option for unknown). You can also add in the time and date, additional comments, and the length of the debris.

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If you are ever in the Cordova area or around the Gulf of Alaska make sure to post what debris you find! This will help with cleanup and pollution monitoring !

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com

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