Mission Possible: Addressing Health Disparities in Heart Disease and Stroke Outcomes

Heart disease is one of the leading causes of  death in the united states. The prevalence of heart disease is higher in certain groups of people. These group of people include those associated with poverty and lack of education. Also, people associated with racial and ethnic minorities. Areas such as Southeast, Appalachia and the Mississippi Delta, experience a higher prevalence in heart disease because they experience a lower education rate and a higher poverty rate. They also have a hard time accessing health care and community supports. Heart diseases today are characterized by tobacco use, poor diet and lack of physical activity. Public health helps to prevent and reduce tobacco use, improve nutrition, increase opportunities for physical activity. this helps control the rate of heart disease in some populations.

Advertisements

The data is in: Americans who don’t finish high school are less healthy than the rest of the US

“…adults with no high school diploma or GED are consistently at the greatest risk for the leading causes of disease and death.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans who do not finish high school are behind in terms of living a healthy life compared to those with a GED degree. Although people with less than a high school education has experienced a decline in heart disease, this population consistently reported the highest percent for heart disease. Adults with higher education also do better in terms of smoking as well. Education is very important in living a healthy life. Report shows that people that have at least a high school degree an aid in taking medications properly; interpreting medication labels or food labels; and finding the appropriate preventive care….

 

http://theconversation.com/the-data-is-in-americans-who-dont-finish-high-school-are-less-healthy-than-the-rest-of-the-us-103663

Paralyzed patients are walking again with help from pain stimulator

Screen Shot 2018-09-25 at 9.15.00 AM

“At least five people whose legs were completely paralyzed are walking again, two of them with no outside help, thanks to a specialized program of therapy and a pain stimulator implanted in their spines, researchers reported Monday.”

This is the latest and most dramatic advance developed at the University of Louisville in Kentucky to treat spinal cord injuries. In their report, they show that electrical stimulation of the spine coupled with intense specialized training programs can reteach the body and help move legs although the brain signals have been compromised or cut off.

“It might be that the spinal cord can act on its own, almost completely without signals from the brain, Harkema told NBC News.”

“Harkema said the spine is much more independent of the brain than had been thought. It’s the same principle that is at work when a chicken continues to run around even after its head has been cut off, she said: the spine can signal muscles to move, independently of the brain.”

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/paralyzed-patients-are-walking-again-help-pain-stimulator-n912541

Wearable tech could quell opioid epidemic

“Quell is a device that aims to reduce the use of opioid pain medicine by stimulating the nervous system and activating natural pain blockers in the body. Dr. Shai Gozani of Waltham developed the technology and said his product can diminish the reliance on opioid pain medication users.”

Screen Shot 2018-09-20 at 1.52.29 PM

http://www.bostonherald.com/business/business_markets/2018/09/wearable_tech_could_quell_opioid_epidemic

Wearable devices and mobile health technology—one step towards better health

With increasing efforts being made to address the current global obesity epidemic, wearable mobile health (“mHealth”) technology has been deemed a great tool for promoting physical activity and encouraging healthy habits. Current research also pinpoints the need for these new technologies that can serve best as part of a larger overall health plan, rather than working with individuals to encourage weight loss and nutrition.

wearable

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-wearable-devices-mobile-health-technologyone.html

Health care is broken. Oscar Health thinks Tech can fix it.

America’s healthcare industry is a mess: from confusing regulations to perverse incentives. Meanwhile, Mario Schlosser, the CEO of Oscar Health, has moved from academia and created a company, called Oscar, with Joshua Kushner (brother of Jared Kushner) to try to solve these problems. “The goal of Oscar is to do to health care what Uber did to the taxi industry: use smart digital technology to make everything faster and easier for customers, and then use the data gathered to build radically new services, which can collect more data that leads to new services.” said Schlosser. Google’s parent company, Alphabet, has committed roughly $375 million in investments to this digital relief.

marioschlosser-RTX35Z44

https://www.wired.com/story/oscar-health-ceo-mario-schlosser-interview/

Map of Sickle Cell and Malaria in Africa

Here is an interesting article on the distribution of sickle cell anemia and malaria across the African continent. The authors of this article also details various testing instruments and measures for HIV/AIDS and other conditions.

Below is a map that illustrates the distribution of malaria and sickle cell anemia in Africa. Click on the website here to download the article!

sickle cell Africa

Source: Listick Daniel, Nanbol & Onuigwe, Festus & I.M., AbdulAzeez & B Osadolor, Humphrey & M.A.O, Okungbowa & O.J., Ikeama & Bukar, Alhaji & Emokpae, Abiodun & J.P.C., Nnadi & T, Nuhu & O.G., Ighalo & S.A., Shinkafi & Omoruyi Pius, Omosigho & Imoru, Momodu & Ikechukwu, Iwueke & Isah Ladu, Adama. (2017). SOKOTO JOURNAL OF MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE (SJMLS) VOLUME 2 ISSUE 2 JUNE 2017.