Active NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Sites – 2017

Active_Nurse-Corps-Loan-Repayment-Site

The NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Program is a program that supports registered nurses, advanced practice registered nurses and nurse faculty by paying up to 85%  of their student dept. Check out this heat density map which shows the number of active NURSE Corps Loan Repayment sites as of 2017. Nurses that work at these sites are eligible to have some of their student loans forgiven. From the map we can see some highly concentrated areas in the Northeastern states.

Source: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Data Warehouse. Accessed on 10/11/2017 https://datawarehouse.hrsa.gov/tools/DataPortalResults.aspx

Advertisements

Active Rural Status NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Sites – 2017

NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Rural Health Facility Locations

The NURSE Corps Loan Repayment Program is a program that supports registered nurses, advanced practice registered nurses and nurse faculty by paying up to 85% of their student dept. Check out this heat density map which shows the number of active rural status NURSE Corps Loan Repayment sites as of 2017. The map shows locations in rural communities and nurses that work at these sites are eligible to have some of their student loans forgiven.

Source: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Data Warehouse. Accessed on 10/11/2017 https://datawarehouse.hrsa.gov/tools/DataPortalResults.aspx

By Julia Watson

Opioid Epidemic Pushes Florida Medical Schools To Change Curriculum

The opioid epidemic is not secret and has been the talk of public health and any health advocates have been trying to find ways to combat the epidemic. A group of nine Florida medical schools in particular are coming together to develop a common curriculum focused on pain and opioid prescriptions for medical students. For more information click here.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/health/94422092-132.html

By Julia Watson 

Age-Adjusted Narcotic Poisoning Mortality Rate by County (1999 – 2015)

Narcotic3_Poisoning-_Rate_1990-2015-1024x768

Check out this map that depicts the age-adjusted narcotic poisoning mortality rate by county from 1999 to 2015. From the map we can see high rates of narcotic mortality in about every region of the U.S. As a result, narcotic poisoning and the deaths that ensue are an issue for all of us to think deeply about.

By Julia Watson

The Transformation From Skin Cells to Brain Cells

In the US approximately 5.1 million people have Alzheimer’s disease [1] and usually research involving the disease is done on animals. However, researchers from the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have developed a new technique allowing them to transform human skin cells into stem cells and programing them into microglial cells. This new technique will allow researchers to use human cells instead of animal cells. Microglial cells play an important role in Alzheimer’s disease so this new method will allow researchers to have a better understand of the biology behind the disease.

Check out the article here.
By Julia Watson

Years of Potential Life Lost Rate (2011 to 2013)

Check out this map that shows the years of potential life lost rate from years 2011 to 2013. The years of potential life lost rate, also known as premature mortality rate, measures the frequency in which people are dying. From the map we can see a pronounced cluster of states darkly shaded (Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia) indicating a large proportion of counties within these states had a high rate of premature deaths. In other words people who lived within these counties were dying at an early age. In contrast we can see counties within states such as, Maine, Road Island, Vermont are lightly shaded yellow/orange, indicating people who lived within these counties were dying at an older age.

MOTD7_13_17_YPPL_2011to2013

For more information click here

By Julia Watson

Poor Sleep Could Increase Your Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

A study published in the journal Brain found that poor sleeping can increase levels of proteins, beta-amyloid and tau, involved in Alzheimer’s disease. The data suggested that in some participants when their slow wave sleep was disrupted on average their levels of beta amyloid increased by 10 %. Interestingly, the duration of sleep did not affect beta amyloid, but did increase the levels of tau. Thus, the study showed that poor quality sleep could lead to an increase of beta amyloid and tau causing the risk of plaque to build up in the brain and eventually increasing a person’s risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Check out the article here.

3500

By Julia Watson