Years of Potential Life Lost Rate (2011 to 2013)

Check out this map that shows the years of potential life lost rate from years 2011 to 2013. The years of potential life lost rate, also known as premature mortality rate, measures the frequency in which people are dying. From the map we can see a pronounced cluster of states darkly shaded (Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia) indicating a large proportion of counties within these states had a high rate of premature deaths. In other words people who lived within these counties were dying at an early age. In contrast we can see counties within states such as, Maine, Road Island, Vermont are lightly shaded yellow/orange, indicating people who lived within these counties were dying at an older age.

MOTD7_13_17_YPPL_2011to2013

For more information click here

By Julia Watson

Chlamydia Rate By County 2013

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) chlamydia is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the U.S. [1] largely affecting men and women between the ages of 20 to 24. If untreated chlamydia can cause detrimental damage to a women’s reproductive system. [2]

Check out this map which shows the incidence of chlamydia by US counties in 2013 per 100,000 population. From the map, we can see most of states have a couple counties that are shaded dark indicating a high rate of newly diagnosed cases. Overall, we can see most counties have newly diagnosed causes of chlamydia.

MOTD7_12_17_ChlamydiaRate2013For more information click here.

By Julia Watson

 

Vacant Housing Units 2010- 2014

This map was put together by Meharry Medical College with data from 2010- 2014 from the  America Community Survey. The data represents the percentage empty housing units across the US with the lightest color representing 1-12.4% and the darkest red color showing 44.9-81.3%. View this map and other data maps on communitymappingforhealthequity.org

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www.toxicsites.us

This interesting webpage displays toxic locations or superfund sites throughout the US based on the year it was discovered, the type of waste, the site’s hazardous ranking score, population size near the site, and race around the location. Brooke Singer and team wanted to show the areas of these superfund sites and provide a map that the community could interact with. Check the site out at www.toxicsites.us

Below is a full view of the US in 2015 and under is zoomed in on New Jersey in the New Brunswick area. Thanks www.toxicsites.us for the interesting map!

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Climate Change- How Sea Level Rise Could Change Where & How We Live

Climate change is always a hot topic, literally. With the melting of the ice caps, the unstable polar vortex which influences the jet stream, and with temperatures becoming more extreme, it is no mystery that sea level is continuing to rise. We wanted to visualize the threat of sea level rise by making a map that shows the potential projections of how our coasts in New Jersey and New York could eventual look.

nyc 1   nyc2   nyc3
We zoomed in to focus on New York City and the Northeastern part of the New Jersey coastline. We gathered the information for sea level rise from usgs.gov and then created the map using our Mappler technology. The first image is what the coast currently looks like, with the second and third images showing possible sea level rise projections. Image 2 shows sea level rise projections for 2100 if climate change continues without us taking action. This projection shows a 2m rise, with the dark blue border showing the potential new coastline. Image 3 is the worse case scenario for the year 2100, meaning that this is what scientists are projecting if again no action towards stopping or slowing climate change takes place and if the Greenland ice sheet melts. Image 3 shows a 7m sea level rise, and as you can see the land taken is massive. These maps show the scary reality that we could face if climate change is not taken seriously. You think that the population and its growth are bad now? How about when we then have to face displacement of part of the population because land where they use to live is covered in water? Take action, educate on climate change, and do your part!

To see the map and view more of the NJ and NY coast projections click here!

Flint Lead Testing Map

This map on michiganradio.org  from February 1st, depicts the results of home lead tests in Flint. The test information, gathered by the State, was then grouped into the following categories to make this map:

  • 0 ppb – no lead detected in the drinking water
  • 1-4 ppb – the EPA deems this range as acceptable
  • 5-14 ppb – exposure is a concern, but still below an EPA “federal action level”
  • 15-49 ppb – a range above the federal action level for lead, but can be treated by filters
  • 50-149 ppb – reaching dangerous levels, but can be treated by filters
  • 150 and above – a range at which the federal government says water filters might not workScreen Shot 2016-04-28 at 11.02.29 AM.png

Looking at this map, trying to determine the source is difficult because no real pattern can be determined. Makes you think about what other areas in the US have horrible water that either hasn’t been discovered yet, or just taken seriously.

Thanks Michigan Radio for the map! All information from michiganradio.org 

Happy Earth Day! NYC Tree Map

Trees help city areas with reducing pollution, they help to improve health, and overall bring a sense of calm to a place known for fast-pace living. Here is a map we created on Mappler using data from the TreesCount! 2015 by the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation. This map is color-coded based on condition of the trees. 

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Looking at the density screenshot, it is interesting to view where the best versus worst rated trees are located. The photo on the left shows where the worst rated trees are, and the right shows the trees rated as the best. Lets keep adding trees to our concrete jungle! Click here to see the site.

Good_Trees.PNG      Poor_Trees.PNG