Years of Potential Life Lost Rate (2011 to 2013)

Check out this map that shows the years of potential life lost rate from years 2011 to 2013. The years of potential life lost rate, also known as premature mortality rate, measures the frequency in which people are dying. From the map we can see a pronounced cluster of states darkly shaded (Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia) indicating a large proportion of counties within these states had a high rate of premature deaths. In other words people who lived within these counties were dying at an early age. In contrast we can see counties within states such as, Maine, Road Island, Vermont are lightly shaded yellow/orange, indicating people who lived within these counties were dying at an older age.

MOTD7_13_17_YPPL_2011to2013

For more information click here

By Julia Watson

Percent of Children in Poverty in 2014

The United States is classified as one the the major developed economies according to the United Nations [1]. However, with its economic advancement children within the U.S. a good proportion of children still live in poverty. This is problematic because research has shown individuals living in poverty are more likely to encounter issues such as hunger, thirst and health issues.  The map below shows the percent of children who were living in poverty in 2014. From the map we can see only a few counties are shaded white whereas the majority of US counties are shaded indicating most children, to some degree, are living in poverty. From the map we can also see that in some counties close to half the children are living in poverty, indicated by the darker shade. Maps such as this allow policy makers, health providers and health advocates see where resources are most need.

MOTD7_11_17_%children in povertyFor more information click here

By Julia Watson

Chlamydia Rate By County 2013

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) chlamydia is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the U.S. [1] largely affecting men and women between the ages of 20 to 24. If untreated chlamydia can cause detrimental damage to a women’s reproductive system. [2]

Check out this map which shows the incidence of chlamydia by US counties in 2013 per 100,000 population. From the map, we can see most of states have a couple counties that are shaded dark indicating a high rate of newly diagnosed cases. Overall, we can see most counties have newly diagnosed causes of chlamydia.

MOTD7_12_17_ChlamydiaRate2013For more information click here.

By Julia Watson

 

Chasing Ice

I’ve posted a few things about changing temperatures and human impact consequences, so I wanted to share a documentary that I recently saw called Chasing Ice. This documentary follows environmental photographer James Balog, on his passionate project to give the public visual evidence of global warming. Balog and his team decided to focus on melting glaciers, and the drastic changes that are adding to sea level rise. With the ongoing controversy on the truth of global warming, Balog knew that people needed evidence that they could see with their own eyes. Balog and team of scientists, EIS engineers, and photo assistants, traveled to Greenland, Iceland, and Alaska capturing otherwise never could be seen glacial calving. They set up timer cameras to capture images of glacier melting over a few month period and created a time-lapse video which gave the public a real look into how temperature is effecting these areas. Even though these places seem and are so far away, our daily choices effect them, and in turn will effect us in the future. Be sure to check out the documentary, which can be found on Netflix! Our impact does effect the environment, and now the argument of “not seeing” our effects, can in fact be seen and trust me it will shock you.

Screen shot 2015-03-09 at 3.57.24 PMScreen shot 2015-03-09 at 4.04.25 PMWatch the trailer here! Click here to visit the Chasing Ice website!

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Contact us at gis@vertices.com.