The data is in: Americans who don’t finish high school are less healthy than the rest of the US

“…adults with no high school diploma or GED are consistently at the greatest risk for the leading causes of disease and death.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans who do not finish high school are behind in terms of living a healthy life compared to those with a GED degree. Although people with less than a high school education has experienced a decline in heart disease, this population consistently reported the highest percent for heart disease. Adults with higher education also do better in terms of smoking as well. Education is very important in living a healthy life. Report shows that people that have at least a high school degree an aid in taking medications properly; interpreting medication labels or food labels; and finding the appropriate preventive care….

 

http://theconversation.com/the-data-is-in-americans-who-dont-finish-high-school-are-less-healthy-than-the-rest-of-the-us-103663

HIV Prevalence Rates in GA in 2015

AIDSVu.org has information on HIV prevalence and incidence rates and cases from all counties and states in the U.S. The information is also broken down by demographic and mode of transmission. On the national map, it appears that the southeastern and eastern regions of the U.S. made up a significant portion of the persons living with HIV in the U.S. in 2015. Some of these states included Louisiana, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, Delaware, New Jersey and New York. The site also provides information on services individuals can utilize for testing and treatment purposes.  The map below shows the rates of HIV prevalence in Georgia in 2015. According to the local data provided by the site, there were approximately 49,463 people in Georgia living with HIV at the time of data collection. To view more HIV data on specific counties in GA or from other counties and states in the U.S., click on the website, here.

Georgia-Map_cropped

Source: https://aidsvu.org/state/georgia/

Mapping School Suspensions in the U.S.

Suspensions and expulsions significantly impact students’ progress in school; they prevent students from receiving an education because they keep students out of the classroom. In 2015, the U.S. Department of Education held a conference for educators across the country to rethink methods of discipline that don’t involve suspension or expulsion. At this conference, alternative methods for disciplining students were introduced, including a School Climate and Discipline Guide Package that focused on protecting the civil rights of students and using non-exclusionary forms of discipline.

Below are two maps provided by the U.S. Department of Education. The first map illustrates the percentage of students with disabilities who received out of school suspensions (OSS) and the second map illustrates the percentage of all students who received OSS across the country.

Please visit the U.S. Department of Education’s web page here to learn more about this initiative.

IDEA Suspensions

Source: https://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/educators-gather-white-house-rethink-school-discipline

Total SuspensionsSource: https://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/educators-gather-white-house-rethink-school-discipline

Preventive Dental Care for Children in GA – A look at the disparities.

Preventive oral health care is essential for one’s overall health. For children, it is important to address oral health needs earlier in life to prevent oral health issues from forming and progressing into adulthood. Below is a map of the percentage of children in Georgia with financial access to preventive dental care. This map comes from an article written by Cao, Gentili, Griffin, Griffin & Serban (2017) titled, “Disparities in Preventive Dental Care Among Children in Georgia.”

The authors of the article state that financial access is, “the percentage of children who either are eligible for public insurance or have the ability to afford dental care through commercial insurance or ability to pay out-of-pocket,” (Cao et al., 2017). Although there are plenty of children who are eligible to receive public funding for preventive dental care in GA, only 27.9% of the 4,123 dentists in GA who offer preventive dental services to children accept public insurance, (Cao et al., 2017).

What are your thoughts? What does financial access to preventive dental care mean to you? Is this an accurate representation of financial access? I invite you to read more of the article on the CDC’s website, here

GA preventive oral healh care for chilldren

Source: Cao S, Gentili M, Griffin PM, Griffin SO, Serban N. Disparities in Preventive Dental Care Among Children in Georgia. Prev Chronic Dis 2017;14:170176. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5888/pcd14.170176.

Climate Change- How Sea Level Rise Could Change Where & How We Live

Climate change is always a hot topic, literally. With the melting of the ice caps, the unstable polar vortex which influences the jet stream, and with temperatures becoming more extreme, it is no mystery that sea level is continuing to rise. We wanted to visualize the threat of sea level rise by making a map that shows the potential projections of how our coasts in New Jersey and New York could eventual look.

nyc 1   nyc2   nyc3
We zoomed in to focus on New York City and the Northeastern part of the New Jersey coastline. We gathered the information for sea level rise from usgs.gov and then created the map using our Mappler technology. The first image is what the coast currently looks like, with the second and third images showing possible sea level rise projections. Image 2 shows sea level rise projections for 2100 if climate change continues without us taking action. This projection shows a 2m rise, with the dark blue border showing the potential new coastline. Image 3 is the worse case scenario for the year 2100, meaning that this is what scientists are projecting if again no action towards stopping or slowing climate change takes place and if the Greenland ice sheet melts. Image 3 shows a 7m sea level rise, and as you can see the land taken is massive. These maps show the scary reality that we could face if climate change is not taken seriously. You think that the population and its growth are bad now? How about when we then have to face displacement of part of the population because land where they use to live is covered in water? Take action, educate on climate change, and do your part!

To see the map and view more of the NJ and NY coast projections click here!

Funding Proposal- Accelerating Interprofessional Community-Based Education and Practice

The National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The John A. Hartford Foundation, the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, is soliciting proposals designed to accelerate the development of creative, robust and sustainable interprofessional initiatives in which graduate nursing and one or more other professions actively learn and work together with individuals and their families in community-based clinical settings (nexusipe.org).

The goal of the initiative is for health and other professional schools, with a history of collaboration, to work together with a community partner and the individuals and families that it serves to develop innovative, creative and sustainable interprofessional clinical initiatives that accelerate their existing interprofessional education (IPE) and collaboration (IPC) work (nexusipe.org).

  • Closing Date– July 15, 2016 11:59pm EDT
  • Winners Notified– September 15, 2016
  • Funding Opportunity– “Up to 20 graduate nursing programs that collaborate with one or more professional schools and a community clinical setting will receive up to $50,000 for a two-year initiative” (nexusipe.org)
  • Eligibility
    • Applicants must be an accredited nursing school with graduate programs committed to working in partnership with other health and non-health related professional schools and a community-based clinical partner.
    • Applicants must partner with at least one other professional school (health or non-health) and a community-based clinical site.
    • The principal investigator must be a faculty member in a nursing school/program, based in the United States or its territories.
    • Proposals that demonstrate existing inter-professional relationships that will be accelerated by this funding are encouraged.
  • More Information– nexusipe.org
  • Online Submission– www.conferenceabstracts.com

all information for this funding opportunity and post from nexusipe.org

MERS Map

Not only does our team at Vertices work with environmental groups, but we also participate in and work with individuals, groups, and organizations, with disaster relief initiatives. Currently we are working with Korean citizens on a map that provides real-time information on the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) outbreak.

Dr. Im and his team have created www.mersjido.com in order to help organize all of the information on the disease. The map uses Google Map API and our Community Mapping Platform called Mappler, which was created by Dr. Im. This site is based on citizen participatory mapping, which means the public can easily access it and are able to add information. This community map gives the people in Korea a way to view all information on MERS just by accessing the site on their computer or phone.

Screen shot 2015-06-11 at 1.06.37 PM

www.mersjido.com is being updated by several Korean volunteers, and information is being shared on Facebook consistently. This map is a great example of how citizen participatory mapping can improve disaster management. The ability to visit the site and add/update information by using a web or mobile device, again provides the public a quick and easy way to see and add important information.

Dr. Wansoo Im, who also made NYRestroom.com in 2005, which is based on crowd-sourcing (featured in The New Yorker). Dr. Im and his team also mapped all the available gas stations in the affected US areas during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. His map was used in New York City, and surrounding areas, and by FEMA, Google Crisis Map, and the US Department of Energy during the crisis.

Contact us if you want to use Mappler for your business or project. Visit the MERS site at www.mersjido.com and check out mappler.net for more information on Mappler.

Posted by Intern Eva Gerrits. Contact gis@vertices.com. Click here to view the Korean MERS Map.

NRDC- Renewable Energy for America

I found this really interesting map on Natural Resources Defense Council’s website that shows existing and planned renewable energy sources across the United States. I think it is super important to look into and input renewable energy sources, and that the US should continue to be open in incorporating lasting energy efficient sources of power. I feel like many other nations are ahead of us in making the switch from non-renewable to renewable sources, so lets continue to step up! Take a look at the map and see what green energy sources are in your state or soon will be. The map shows wind, solar, advanced biofuel, biodigesters, geothermal, and low-impact hydroelectric facilitates that are currently in the US and planned to be built or operated soon. Check out the site to see the energy map for the US or take a closer look at each state on www.nrdc.org/energy/renewables/energymap.asp.

This map shows all the existing renewable sources in the US.
This map shows all the existing renewable sources in the US.

Posted by Intern Eva Gerrits. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com

Allergy Forecast- Pollen.com

Personally, my allergies have been horrible so far! I recently heard that pollen this year is worst then it has been in recent seasons. Taking a good allergy medicine is key, but you can also protect yourself by being knowledgeable about the pollen count in your area. I found an allergy forecast map on Pollen.com that shows you the allergy levels in your given area across the United States. You can look at the general prediction for each state on the site which is colored coded- green for low, light green for low-medium, yellow for medium, orange for medium-high, and red for high. Also you can click your state or area of desire for a more detailed report. Once you click the state, you can enter your zip code or pick your city on the drop down menu.

Screen shot 2015-05-13 at 11.49.42 AMCheck out the site on Pollen.com or click here. Thanks pollen.com for the helpful map!

Posted by Intern Eva Gerrits. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com

Tox Town- NLM.gov

I came across an easy to use, easy to learn from, & very interactive site put together by the US National Library of Medicine. The name of the site is Tox Town, and here you can pick which neighborhood you would like to learn more about (city, farm, port, town, border region, or southwest) and learn locations in those neighborhoods where potential hazardous chemicals could be.

When I visited the site I choose the town as my neighborhood, and as you can see in the picture there are various locations given and are shown where they are on the map by just scrolling over the name. If you click on a particular location for example the school, additional information is given on what toxic substances could be present. Looking at the picture, you can also see names of chemicals that could be potentially found in the town, and again scrolling over the name will show you where the chemicals are found on the map.

Screen shot 2015-01-05 at 3.33.09 PM

This site is great for learning and helpful for all ages. Props to the NLM! Check out the site on http://toxtown.nlm.nih.gov/index.php

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com