Is technology the future of healthcare?

The goal of health technology is to assist in more efficient data collection, increase connectivity, and foresee market changes. A push for a more healthy lifestyle across the United States has lead to an increasing need for innovative ideas that can lead to healthy behavior changes. Even with governmental efforts, life expectancy in the United States has decreased, inequities in healthcare persist in rural communities and healthcare costs are still at an all time high. Developing partnerships between healthcare communities and business technology firms has the possibility to strengthen the development of evidence-based research and HIPAA-compliant clinical resources that can contribute to an improved population health in the United States. Using these firms can also establish  more reputable platforms, health analytics, and marketing expertise that could serve beneficial to the current healthcare issues.

Implementing technology into exercise devices has lead to success stories surrounding smart technology abound. Exercise using smart technology  has been shown to increase physical activity compared to traditional healthcare models. Access to healthcare is also an issue due to the US healthcare industry structure. This can be improved through the use of online applications geared towards connecting clinicians with patients. Through businesses engagement, assistance in the development of technology services that  increases access to low-cost care for patients in need is possible.

Innovative inventions in data collection would assist with patients having access to their own health information. This gives them the opportunity to make informed decisions about their own health. It also reduces redundant testing resulting in patients and clinicians saving time and money. Collaborating with businesses and technology firms on healthcare issues and projects could improve population health overall.

 

References

  1. Stey A, Kanzaria H, Brook R. How disruptive innovation by business and technology firms could improve population health [published online August 16, 2018]. JAMA.doi:10.1001/jama.2018.10782
  2. https://www.medicalbag.com/tech-talk/technology-disruption-improving-us-population-health/article/794210/
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Wearable devices and mobile health technology—one step towards better health

With increasing efforts being made to address the current global obesity epidemic, wearable mobile health (“mHealth”) technology has been deemed a great tool for promoting physical activity and encouraging healthy habits. Current research also pinpoints the need for these new technologies that can serve best as part of a larger overall health plan, rather than working with individuals to encourage weight loss and nutrition.

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https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-wearable-devices-mobile-health-technologyone.html

Las Cruces-Area Group To Launch Data-Driven Adverse Childhood Experiences Prevention Project​

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This community in New Mexico took the effort to combat childhood trauma to new heights. A group of  Dona Ana county agencies initiated a childhood trauma project using data on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). A high ACEs score can result in a child’s diminished capacity to learn in school, diminished work performance, or ability to establish healthy relationships. The project was in response to a community movement to end childhood trauma and maltreatment based on a real Protective Services Division of the New Mexico Children, Youth & Families Department Case.

The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Prevention Project launched on Aug. 8, with a series of events in Las Cruces.  The program includes a face-to-face classroom experience and five web-based lessons for participants to explore strategies for meeting the needs of families and preventing ACEs and trauma. The group believes through a data-driven citywide process, ACEs can be predictable and preventable.

 

 

http://www.krwg.org/post/las-cruces-area-group-launch-data-driven-adverse-childhood-experiences-prevention-project

Importance of Granulation (large scale map) in Maps

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I created the above map using the tutorials in ESRI website for ArcGIS & the content from GIS Tutorial for Health. The map explores the Mammography clinics in relations to counties in Pennsylvania. The pattern of high concentration around cities of Pittsburg and Philadelphia is evident from the maps.

Few other observations from the map are:

Potter and Sullivan counties have fewer women aged 40-74, but still, there are no clinics. They are obvious areas of the state where clinics are needed.
Monroe, Clearfield, Jefferson counties have higher women aged 40-74, but a relatively
small number of clinics.
Philadelphia & Pittsburg surrounding areas have enough clinics, but remote northwestern and northeastern counties need more clinics.

The power of GIS can be further explored to look into the cities that sound to have more mammography clinics, in the map below :

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This map shows that though Allegheny county hosts Pittsburg, there is a pattern of concentration of clinics in the south relatively more urban part of the city. The pattern correlates with other healthcare facilities in the county that counts towards health equities in this county.

Granulation to the smallest unit possible brings in more refined data on what seems to be different in small scale.

Do Socioeconomic Factors Influence Texans’ Decision to Get Vaccinated? – A cartographic Approach

Texas has one of the highest vaccination rates for childhood diseases overall, 97.4%, according to CDC. But the number of children not vaccinated because of their parents’ “personal beliefs”—as opposed to medical reasons—has risen since 2003, when such exemptions were introduced, to more than 44,000 so far in 2017 according to CDC. The 4:3:1:3:3:1:4 series is an overall measure that encompasses many vaccines that are recommended for children. Various demographic factors (sex, gender, race, availability of commercial health insurance) influence the decision to get vaccinated, were looked at.

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The county-level data on the socioeconomic factors were obtained from US Census Bureau (American Factfinder). The health insurance data was obtained from Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE). The vaccination rates were obtained from Texas Immunization registry through DSHS. The data was cleaned and geocoded to be analyzed in ArcGIS to produce maps as shown in Figure 1. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to analyze the relationship between vaccination rates and independent variable.

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The non-vaccination rates are higher around the major cities of Dallas, Austin-San Antonio, Houston and some northwest Texas counties. Population density has a positive correlation with the non-vaccination rate. Other demographic factors have a positive correlation in certain counties as opposed to others.

 

Source: American FactFinder, Texas Immunisation Registry

The limitation on the immunization data is it being an optional registry so it would not be accurate to run statistics off this information to estimate an immunization rate. In future, it is productive to expand this concept to use regression analysis to try to find the odds of the relationship expressed in the maps and to find if there is a significant association.

Average Fine Particulate Matter (PM 2.5) (µg/m³) By County (2011)

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Check out this map that shows the average fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) (µg/m³) by county for the year 2011. From the map we can see clusters with a higher average indicated by the darker shading. For instance, we can see a cluster consisting counties within for Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas and Wyoming. It is also apparent there are higher concentrations in many Southern, Midwestern and Northeastern states compared to western states. States such as, Indiana, Ohio, Tennessee and Kentucky predominantly have a higher average.

By Julia Watson

NHSC and NCQA Certified PCMH Sites In Tennessee

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Check out this map that shows the number of National Health Service Corps (NHSC) sites in Tennessee as of 10/6/17 and the number of National Committee for Quality Assurance certified Patient Center Medical Home (PCMH) sites in Tennessee as of 1/23/18.

For more information on the Patient Centered Medical Home click here.

By Julia Watson