Injury Death Rate By County ( 2009 to 2013)

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Check out this map that shows the rate of deaths due to injury by county for years 2009 to 2013 per 100,000 population. From the map we can see some states have a large portion of counties shaded dark, such as New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona, Montana, Wyoming, Oklahoma, West Virginia indicating they had a higher rate of deaths caused by injury. In contrast, we can see some states such as New York, New Jersey and New Hampshire are predominantly shaded yellow/light orange indicating they had a lower rate of injury deaths. Why might this be? According to the Washington Post blue-collar jobs have the highest rate of fatal occupational injuries. Thus, on might question if the counties with the highest rate of injury death also reflect counties where a high proportion of residents have blue-collar jobs?

By Julia Watson

Preventable Hospital Stay Rate By County 2013

Ambulatory-care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are conditions where effective community care and management can help prevent the need for hospital admission. The map below shows the rate of hospital stays for ACSCs per 1,000 Medicare enrollees. From the map we can see a large portion of counties within western states had a lower ACSCs rate indicated by the yellow/light orange shading compared to counties within various southern states who had higher rates, indicated by the darker shaded counties. Map like this allow health providers to then look deeper into why these rates vary. For instance, since ACSC’s are medical problems that are potentially preventable, such as hypertension, health care providers might hypothesize counties with higher rates are lacking health care providers.

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By Julia Watson

 

Opioid Prescribing Various Among US Counties

 

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Check out this map from the CDC which shows which counties in 2015 had high opioid prescribing.  The CDC found similar characteristics amongst these counties such as having a higher percent of white residents, more dentists and primary care providers, more people who were uninsured or unemployed.

By Julia Watson

Average Daily PM 2.5 By County in 2011

MOTD7_19_17_AvgPM252011Particulate Matter (PM) are small particles that contain microscopic solids and liquid droplets that are suspended in the air which can be inhaled and cause health effects. PM range in size, but particles less than 10 mm present the greatest threat. Some particles are emitted directly from a source such as, smokestacks, fires, construction sites, etc. and others are a result of complex atmospheric reactions [1].

Check out this map that shows the average daily PM 2.5 by county in 2011. From the graph we see a three distinct darkly shaded clusters indicating a high amount of daily exposure. The first cluster includes counties in Nevada and Utah. The second cluster includes counties within Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas and Nebraska. The third and most prominent includes counties within various southern states such as, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and North and South Carolina. In contrast, we can see states such as Oregon, Texas, California and Arizona are shaded yellow indicating a lower daily average.

By Julia Watson

 

Percent of Excessive Drinking By County 2014

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Check out this map that shows the percentage of adults who reported binge or heavy drinking in 2014 by county. From the map we can see the majority of counties within Midwestern states and Alaska are shaded dark indicating adults reported a high percentage of excessive drinking. In contrast, southern states, such as Oklahoma, Tennessee, Alabama, Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi, North and South Carolina have counties shaded yellow/orange indicating adults reported a low percent of excessive drinking.

Check out the map here.

By Julia Watson

Years of Potential Life Lost Rate (2011 to 2013)

Check out this map that shows the years of potential life lost rate from years 2011 to 2013. The years of potential life lost rate, also known as premature mortality rate, measures the frequency in which people are dying. From the map we can see a pronounced cluster of states darkly shaded (Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia) indicating a large proportion of counties within these states had a high rate of premature deaths. In other words people who lived within these counties were dying at an early age. In contrast we can see counties within states such as, Maine, Road Island, Vermont are lightly shaded yellow/orange, indicating people who lived within these counties were dying at an older age.

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For more information click here

By Julia Watson

Chlamydia Rate By County 2013

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) chlamydia is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the U.S. [1] largely affecting men and women between the ages of 20 to 24. If untreated chlamydia can cause detrimental damage to a women’s reproductive system. [2]

Check out this map which shows the incidence of chlamydia by US counties in 2013 per 100,000 population. From the map, we can see most of states have a couple counties that are shaded dark indicating a high rate of newly diagnosed cases. Overall, we can see most counties have newly diagnosed causes of chlamydia.

MOTD7_12_17_ChlamydiaRate2013For more information click here.

By Julia Watson