Percent of Females Who Received Mammogram Screening By County 2013

MOTD8_9_17_%mammogramsA mammogram is a screening tool used to screen for breast cancer.  According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and is one of the  three most common cancers that causes death among women [1]. For these reasons it is important for women who meet the breast cancer screening guidelines to undergo screening to detect any abnormalities or cancer early to quickly begin treatment.  Check out this map that shows the percent of women who received mammogram screening in 2013 by county. From the map we can see some counties are shaded darker than others, indicating a higher percentage of women in these counties received mammogram screenings, such as counties within New York, Maine, and Road Island. In contrast, we can see some counties within states such as, Texas, Nevada, Arizona, Oklahoma are shaded yellow/light orange indicating a low percent of women received mammograms.

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By Julia Watson

Can Gold Be Used For Cancer Treatment?

Scientist at Edinburgh University have discovered new properties of gold and have found ways to use nano fragments of gold in cancer treatment. The team’s research suggest the metal could be used to safely release cancer drugs inside tumors. The researchers are hoping that one day their discovery will allow for the development of implants that would that would allow this and reduce the damaging effects to healthy organs. Interested, read more here.

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By Julia Watson

Percent of Severe Housing Problems By County (2008 to 2012)

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Today’s map of the day shows the percent of severe housing problems by county for years 2008 to 2012. Severe housing problems was defined as households with at least 1 of 4 housing problems including: overcrowding, high housing cost, or lack of kitchen or plumbing facilities. From the map we can see a large portion of counties within Alaska and some western states, such as California, Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington have a higher percentage of severe housing problems indicated by the dark shaded counties compared to counties within other regions, such as the Midwest.

By Julia Watson

Percent Alcohol-impaired Driving Dealths By County ( 2010 to 2014)

Check out this map that shows the percent alcohol-impaired driving deaths by county for years 2010 to 2014. From the map we can see the driving deaths with alcohol universally affects all states. We can see some Midwestern and Northwestern states have a large portion of counties with a higher percent of driving deaths with alcohol impairment with ranging between 45 – 100%  indicated by the darker shaded counties.

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By Julia Watson

Preventable Hospital Stay Rate By County 2013

Ambulatory-care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are conditions where effective community care and management can help prevent the need for hospital admission. The map below shows the rate of hospital stays for ACSCs per 1,000 Medicare enrollees. From the map we can see a large portion of counties within western states had a lower ACSCs rate indicated by the yellow/light orange shading compared to counties within various southern states who had higher rates, indicated by the darker shaded counties. Map like this allow health providers to then look deeper into why these rates vary. For instance, since ACSC’s are medical problems that are potentially preventable, such as hypertension, health care providers might hypothesize counties with higher rates are lacking health care providers.

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By Julia Watson

 

Opioid Prescribing Various Among US Counties

 

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Check out this map from the CDC which shows which counties in 2015 had high opioid prescribing.  The CDC found similar characteristics amongst these counties such as having a higher percent of white residents, more dentists and primary care providers, more people who were uninsured or unemployed.

By Julia Watson