The data is in: Americans who don’t finish high school are less healthy than the rest of the US

“…adults with no high school diploma or GED are consistently at the greatest risk for the leading causes of disease and death.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans who do not finish high school are behind in terms of living a healthy life compared to those with a GED degree. Although people with less than a high school education has experienced a decline in heart disease, this population consistently reported the highest percent for heart disease. Adults with higher education also do better in terms of smoking as well. Education is very important in living a healthy life. Report shows that people that have at least a high school degree an aid in taking medications properly; interpreting medication labels or food labels; and finding the appropriate preventive care….

 

http://theconversation.com/the-data-is-in-americans-who-dont-finish-high-school-are-less-healthy-than-the-rest-of-the-us-103663

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Areas Where Vaping is Banned or Restricted

hd-map-restricted-and-banned-vape-areas

Source

Governments are back and forth in deciding how healthy vaping truly is. Based off of the World Health Organization’s opinion in 2014, which highlighted concerns about the health effects of vaping, this map depicts countries that have either banned or placed restrictions on vaping. For more information you can visit The Sun, a news UK company’s webpage.

 

 

 

Environmental Indicators and Respiratory Health Trends

Respiratory Health

Over at Mappler, we created a map showing environmental indicators and trends in respiratory health such as lunch care mortality. The map also includes PM 2.5 data measuring particulate pollution. Particulate pollution especially microscopic solids or liquid droplets have been linked with serious health problems since they can get deep into the lungs and cause damage. Studies have linked particulate pollution with outcomes such as

  • premature death in people with heart or lung disease
  • nonfatal heart attacks
  • irregular heartbeat
  • aggravated asthma
  • decreased lung function
  • increased respiratory symptoms, such as irritation of the airways, coughing or difficulty breathing.

More data is being added to the map such as ambulatory care sensitive conditions, children in poverty and smoking data from the Center of Disease Control’s (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Check out the map here. Interested in doing a similar project? Check out our site for more information.

Juhi Mawla, Intern, gis@vertices.com 

Other sources: http://www.epa.gov/pm/health.html