Radon Levels in the USA

This is a follow up post about the radon levels in the United States of America. As mentioned in an earlier post, radon is formed when uranium breaks down into radium, which breaks down into radon. Radon is absorbed by the soil and ends up in water wells and home foundations. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), radon levels shouldn’t exceed 4.0 pCi/L (pico curies per liter). The map below shows the radon levels by color – yellow representing Zone 1; counties where average indoor radon screening levels are less than 2pCi/L, orange representing Zone 2, counties where average indoor radon screening levels are between 2 and 4 pCi/L, and red representing Zone 3, counties where average indoor radon screening levels exceed 4pCi/L.  According to the National Radon Defense, the best way to know the radon level in your home is to test for it.

Click here to visit the National Radon Defense website to learn more about radon, radon levels in the U.S. and radon testing.

radon usa

Source: https://www.nationalradondefense.com/radon-information/radon-map.html

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Radon Levels in GA

Radon is a colorless, tasteless and odorless gas that can cause lung cancer. According to the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., after tobacco. Radon is formed when uranium breaks down into radium, which breaks down into radon. Radon is absorbed by the soil and can enter homes through the foundation and well water systems. The map below shows the percentage of homes tested with radon levels 4.0 pCi/L and above. The data is from homes which volunteered to test their homes for radon.

Click on the link here to view more information about radon, radon testing and radon levels in Georgia.

 

Source: https://www.fcs.uga.edu/extension/home-radonRadon-County-Map-GA

You Might Have a Radon Problem

Radon Risk

The Washington State Department of Health developed a new map depicting potential risks from radon gas. Radon is a colorless, odorless byproduct created during the decay of uranium found in rocks. Since it is a gas , it can seep into homes and be inhaled by the occupants. Exposure to radon can increase the likelihood of getting lung cancer. the new maps highlight areas where rock formations have the potential for uranium deposits and thus a higher overall risk of radon exposure.

Not sure if randon is a problem in your area? Don’t sweat it. You can buy a simple and inexpensive home test kit at a hardware stores or online in order to provide assurance or suggest other steps to need to be taken.

Read the full article here and check out the map.

Juhi Mawla, Intern, gis@vertices.com