The Availability of Food

These maps from 2010 show the availability of grocery store locations and also the percentage of people who had a car to get there. The topic of food availability is already an interesting conversation.. is there enough food? Is there enough food, but it just isn’t distributed evenly? Why is healthy food more expense then unhealthy? Why has food become more of a business then of a way to survive? Take a look at these maps, because they bring another problem into the mix! Transportation and accessibility.

The information for the maps was collected from the USDA Food Environment Atlas and the maps were created by Meharry Medical College.

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nj.mapplerx.com/map/urisahealth

Take a look at this interesting map we made on Mappler in collaboration with Planning Communities! The map is full of GIS layers that you can toggle to show various information such as crime, food, recreation, transit, and URISA health data in DC. The picture below shows URISA data marking sidewalks, intersections, homeless locations, and garbage. Visit the map to view all the data ! nj.mapplerx.com/map/urisahealth

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Poverty Map- US Census Bureau

Here is another interesting map that we created using Mappler which displays the percentage of the population in 2010 that was considered below the poverty line. This information was gather from the U.S. Census Bureau. Red indicates areas where 30 to about 50 percent are considered living in poverty and blue shows areas where 0 to 10 percent are considered below the poverty line.

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City Population- IIED

This really interesting map on International Institute for Environment and Development’s website, iied.org, shows populations of cities with more then 500,000 people from 1800 to the predicted 2030. The visual that this map gives shows how big our world really is. With a little more than 7 billion people right now, by 2030 that amount will surely grow. Makes you think about what the health, environment, food and water situation will look like when the predicted population for 2030 will be more then 8 billion. I think that if we can increase education efforts on population rise and conservation efforts, we can help to lessen that number or at least be more prepared.

Below is a screenshot from iied.org of cities in 1800 that had more than 500,000 people. London and Beijing had more than a million and Guangzhou and Paris are between 500,000 and a million people.

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Looking at 2015, you can see that 1,029 cities had populations larger than 500,000. Take a look at their site and see what the projection is for the year 2030! Thanks IIED for the cool map!

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all information for this post from iied.org. contact vertices@gis.com. click here for the site.

CDC Map

Data Layering

On m3.mappler.net/cdcmap/ you will find information from the CDC showing a layered map of six featured categories; Demographic and Socio-Economic based on census, Demographic and Socio-Economic based on county, Mortality Rates per 100,000 people, Disease Prevalence Rates, Environmental Data, and Borders.

– Demographic and Socio-Economic (data from the census) including:
  • proportion of mobile housing
  • proportion of institutionalized population
  • per capita income
  • proportion of single parent housholds
  • proportion of housing structures with 10 or more units
  • proportion of housing with no vehicle available
  • proportion of population that is umemployes
  • proportion of population under 18
  • proportion of population that speaks English poorly
  • proportion of housing with more people than rooms
  • proportion of population in poverty
  • proportion of population over 65
  • proportions of non-white population

* US counties also have the same subcategories.

This map shows the layering of the proportion of people that are unemployed and the proportion of the population that speaks English poorly
This map shows the layering of the proportion of people that are unemployed and the proportion of the population that speaks English poorly
– Mortality Rates per 100,000 people
  • liver disease mortality rates
  • colon cancer mortality rates
  • transportation accident mortality rates
  • diabetes mellitus mortality rates
  • ischaemic heart disease mortality rates
  • stroke mortality rates
  • lung cancer mortality rates
  • alzheimers  disease mortality rates
  • cerebrovascular disease mortality rates
  • hypertension mortality rates
  • heart disease mortality rates
  • pancreatic cancer mortality rates
  • breast cancer mortality rates
  • self harm mortality rates
  • flu and pneumonia mortality rates
This map shows the layering of Colon Cancer mortality rates, Breast Cancer mortality rates, and Pancreatic Cancer mortality rates
This map shows the layering of Colon Cancer mortality rates, Breast Cancer mortality rates, and Pancreatic Cancer mortality rates

For further information, more layering, and to see the maps on Disease Prevalence Rates, Environmental Data, and Borders, visit the site !

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com