Antartica’s Largest Iceberg Will Soon Be Non-Existent

On its course to the equator, this massive iceberg breaking off of Antartica’s Ross Shelf is nearing destruction.

Source: https://www.livescience.com/62759-largest-antarctic-iceberg-b15-is-melting.html

The iceberg, called B-15, has been drifting away from Antartica for around 20 years, covering more than 6,600 miles. The iceberg has gradually fractured into multiple smaller sections, and the section pictured is called B-15Z.

Source: https://www.livescience.com/62759-largest-antarctic-iceberg-b15-is-melting.html

This map tracks the course of B-15Z over time, and the iceberg is now passing the South Georgian Islands. The iceberg is nearing the equator, and the warmer tropical waters will quickly melt away the gargantuan ice mass,

For more information and photos:

 

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Marine Debris in Cordova Alaska

A new project has been set up for marine debris mapping in Cordova, Alaska. This is a community map which means that anyone in the area who see debris on the land or water can photograph, pin-point, and share with anyone through the site. Using Mappler, you just add the location you found the debris and then choose what kind of debris it is from the long list of options (there is also an option for unknown). You can also add in the time and date, additional comments, and the length of the debris.

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If you are ever in the Cordova area or around the Gulf of Alaska make sure to post what debris you find! This will help with cleanup and pollution monitoring !

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com

NOAA Marine Debris Program

“The NOAA Marine Debris Program envisions the global ocean and its coasts, users, and inhabitants free from the impacts of marine debris. Our mission is to investigate and solve the problems that stem from marine debris, in order to protect and conserve our nation’s marine environment, natural resources, industries, economy, and people.”- Mission Statement marinedebris.noaa.gov

This great program is doing all they can to keep our water safe, clean, and healthy. Through educational programs, hands-on relief work and working hand-in-hand with the government, non-profits, and the community,  the NOAA Marine Debris Program strives to improve the ocean everyday.

An interesting feature, that you can find on their website, is a map that shows where the MDP is currently working on projects. Some of the projects happening now include the clean-up in the San Diego Bay, trash removal at a NY salt marsh, and modifying crab traps in Alaska. Check out the rest of the project here.

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Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com