Antartica’s Largest Iceberg Will Soon Be Non-Existent

On its course to the equator, this massive iceberg breaking off of Antartica’s Ross Shelf is nearing destruction.

Source: https://www.livescience.com/62759-largest-antarctic-iceberg-b15-is-melting.html

The iceberg, called B-15, has been drifting away from Antartica for around 20 years, covering more than 6,600 miles. The iceberg has gradually fractured into multiple smaller sections, and the section pictured is called B-15Z.

Source: https://www.livescience.com/62759-largest-antarctic-iceberg-b15-is-melting.html

This map tracks the course of B-15Z over time, and the iceberg is now passing the South Georgian Islands. The iceberg is nearing the equator, and the warmer tropical waters will quickly melt away the gargantuan ice mass,

For more information and photos:

 

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A Little Green Does the Body Good

We think that health maps do not only consist of physical health, but also mental! If you are living in the concrete jungle, and although it is beautiful in it’s own unique way, maybe you want to be surrounded by more nature.

I found this cool and informational map by Hana Alberts on ny.curbed.com that shows 40 gardens, parks, and green spaces in NYC that you might not know about! Instead of making the trip to Central Park, check out one of these cool spaces. Go to ny.curbed.com or click here to view the map and website! Thanks Curbed!

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Melting Glacier

Sheridan Glacier

This icy glacier, located right outside Cordova, Alaska, is a beautiful spot that has been a popular location to visit while in the area. There are hiking trails, nearby skiing areas, and walkable glacier areas with ice caves. This breathtaking place of nature unfortunately is seeing some changes in size which could be related to shifts in temperature. On http://www.mappler.net/sheridan/ you can see the changes from an aerial view.

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This photo was taken on April 26, 2003

 

As you can see, there are quite noticeable changes between the top photo and the bottom photo. The ice is being separated further and further apart and looks like the result of temperature change.

 

This photo was taken on August 12, 2013
This photo was taken on August 12, 2013

Visit the site, and check up on how this glacier is doing!

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com