Radon Levels in the USA

This is a follow up post about the radon levels in the United States of America. As mentioned in an earlier post, radon is formed when uranium breaks down into radium, which breaks down into radon. Radon is absorbed by the soil and ends up in water wells and home foundations. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), radon levels shouldn’t exceed 4.0 pCi/L (pico curies per liter). The map below shows the radon levels by color – yellow representing Zone 1; counties where average indoor radon screening levels are less than 2pCi/L, orange representing Zone 2, counties where average indoor radon screening levels are between 2 and 4 pCi/L, and red representing Zone 3, counties where average indoor radon screening levels exceed 4pCi/L.  According to the National Radon Defense, the best way to know the radon level in your home is to test for it.

Click here to visit the National Radon Defense website to learn more about radon, radon levels in the U.S. and radon testing.

radon usa

Source: https://www.nationalradondefense.com/radon-information/radon-map.html

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Radon Levels in GA

Radon is a colorless, tasteless and odorless gas that can cause lung cancer. According to the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., after tobacco. Radon is formed when uranium breaks down into radium, which breaks down into radon. Radon is absorbed by the soil and can enter homes through the foundation and well water systems. The map below shows the percentage of homes tested with radon levels 4.0 pCi/L and above. The data is from homes which volunteered to test their homes for radon.

Click on the link here to view more information about radon, radon testing and radon levels in Georgia.

 

Source: https://www.fcs.uga.edu/extension/home-radonRadon-County-Map-GA

Climate Change- How Sea Level Rise Could Change Where & How We Live

Climate change is always a hot topic, literally. With the melting of the ice caps, the unstable polar vortex which influences the jet stream, and with temperatures becoming more extreme, it is no mystery that sea level is continuing to rise. We wanted to visualize the threat of sea level rise by making a map that shows the potential projections of how our coasts in New Jersey and New York could eventual look.

nyc 1   nyc2   nyc3
We zoomed in to focus on New York City and the Northeastern part of the New Jersey coastline. We gathered the information for sea level rise from usgs.gov and then created the map using our Mappler technology. The first image is what the coast currently looks like, with the second and third images showing possible sea level rise projections. Image 2 shows sea level rise projections for 2100 if climate change continues without us taking action. This projection shows a 2m rise, with the dark blue border showing the potential new coastline. Image 3 is the worse case scenario for the year 2100, meaning that this is what scientists are projecting if again no action towards stopping or slowing climate change takes place and if the Greenland ice sheet melts. Image 3 shows a 7m sea level rise, and as you can see the land taken is massive. These maps show the scary reality that we could face if climate change is not taken seriously. You think that the population and its growth are bad now? How about when we then have to face displacement of part of the population because land where they use to live is covered in water? Take action, educate on climate change, and do your part!

To see the map and view more of the NJ and NY coast projections click here!