Tox Town- NLM.gov

I came across an easy to use, easy to learn from, & very interactive site put together by the US National Library of Medicine. The name of the site is Tox Town, and here you can pick which neighborhood you would like to learn more about (city, farm, port, town, border region, or southwest) and learn locations in those neighborhoods where potential hazardous chemicals could be.

When I visited the site I choose the town as my neighborhood, and as you can see in the picture there are various locations given and are shown where they are on the map by just scrolling over the name. If you click on a particular location for example the school, additional information is given on what toxic substances could be present. Looking at the picture, you can also see names of chemicals that could be potentially found in the town, and again scrolling over the name will show you where the chemicals are found on the map.

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This site is great for learning and helpful for all ages. Props to the NLM! Check out the site on http://toxtown.nlm.nih.gov/index.php

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com

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The NCHHSTP Atlas was created to provide an interactive platform for accessing data collected by CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP). This interactive tool provides CDC an effective way to disseminate data, while allowing users to observe trends and patterns by creating detailed reports, maps, and other graphics.

Currently, the Atlas provides interactive maps, graphs, tables, and figures showing geographic patterns and time trends of HIV, AIDS, viral hepatitis, tuberculosis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and primary and secondary syphilis surveillance data.

Learn more about the map here. Check out the map here.

Jin Lee, Intern, gis@vertices.com 

Map of Vaccine Preventable Outbreaks

Image The Council on Foreign Relations offers this Map of Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks. There’s a clicker to walk through the last six years and an opportunity to contribute data. There is a menu choice called “Introduction” which explains the point: This interactive map visually plots global outbreaks of measles, mumps, whooping cough, polio, rubella, and other diseases that are easily preventable by inexpensive and effective vaccines. The Global Health Program at the Council on Foreign Relations has been tracking news reports on these outbreaks since the fall of 2008. This project aims to promote awareness of a global health problem that is easily preventable. Read the full article here. Jin Lee, Intern, gis@vertices.com

Feeling Sick? Map Your Sickness!!

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If you are wondering about disease trend around the world, you should check out GermTrax.com. GermTrax.com tracks the spread of sickness and disease. The website currently holds record of 387495 sicknesses at 386905 locations. Visitors can easily view and study this information through a health map. This interactive health map shows various reported sickness in different color. Users can view the report date and comment by clicking any of the circles or set a date range to view sickness that occurred during specific time period.

Visit the website and check out the map here.

Jin Lee, Intern, gis@vertices.com 

Massachusetts Health Map

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Is half your child’s grade out with stomach flu?

Are chills and fever rampaging through your office?

We tend to rely on word of mouth to find out important community health news, but now there’s another way. The wbur’s CommonHealth introduced the Massachusetts HealthMap, a disease-tracking tool overseen by researchers at Children’s Hospital Boston with input from public health trackers, the media and you. Have three of your neighbors reported rabid bats lately? Post it here. Or check your town for trouble spots. HealthMap tracks public health outbreaks around the world — and now from our neighborhoods. It gathers reports from official sources, including the Department of Public Health, and the media, and updates them hourly. Reports from the public are curated and updated once a day.

*Keep tabs on what’s happening around you, health-wise, and help others do the same!!

Read the original article and check out the map here.

Jin Lee, Intern, gis@vertices.com 

Interactive Map of Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs)

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The map, published by the Health and Social Care Information Centre, presents the annual results of the Patient Reported Outcome Measures program. This interactive map displays the patient’s opinion on the level of health benefit that they gain from four common NHS operations under different providers. Patients complete PROMs questionnaires about their health before and following surgery. One of several scoring systems used , called the EQ-5D index score, applies across all procedures, capturing different health aspects such as mobility, pain and depression. HSCIC chair Kingsley Manning said: “I am very pleased that the HSCIC is able to offer the public a new tool to make data more accessible on these key operations which thousands of patients undergo each year. “By making our published data available in a variety of formats for patients, care users, the public, clinicians, policymakers and others the HSCIC can play a powerful role in improving health and social care outcomes.”

Read the original article here and check out the map here

Jin Lee, Intern, gis@vertices.com 

Hurricane Sandy: Who died, Where and Why?

Picture1Hurricane Sandy sure did wreck havoc into our lives! But it is over now and things have been fleetingly getting back to normal. The economic, health and environmental impact of the storm are just beginning to be felt but that is for the government to worry about. There are individuals however who will never forget Sandy. People who will never get to see their loved ones again, thanks to Sandy.

This interactive map showing names of people who died, where they died, nature of their death and their age was first published by the New York Times based on data that was collected as deaths were being reported.

Visit theguardian for downloadable data on all reported deaths across the continent.

Data Source: The New York Times http://www.nytimes.com

Renice Obure, Research Intern, gis@vertices.com