HIV Linked to Increased Risk for Both First and Second Primary Cancer Incidence

Image result for cancer picture

Did you know? “The most common types of cancer that inflict people living with HIV are non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Kaposi sarcoma, lung cancer, anal cancer, prostate cancer, liver cancer, correctional cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, oral/pharyngeal cancer, female breast cancer, and cervical cancer.” In the United states,  that are diagnosed with HIV have a 50% chance of being diagnosed with cancer and are less likely to be treated.these are due to the certain disparities that are available. The factors that contribute to these disparities has not be known yet.

There is a new NCCN Guidelines that provides general advice,and also  specific treatment recommended  for non-small cell lung cancer, anal cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, and cervical cancer. it also emphasizes the importance of working with a HIV personnel.  The guideline also urges that people should be offered the same cancer therapy irrespective of their HIV status.

READ MORE ON 

https://www.ajmc.com/newsroom/nccn-releases-guidelines-to-address-treatment-gaps-for-people-with-hiv-and-cancer

Advertisements

HIV Rates by Area of the USA for Adults and Children living with the disease.

CDC_elmore_hivratesbyresidence

Source

The CDC has created a map that shows the Rates of Adults and Adolescents living with a diagnosed HIV infection by the area of residence. This map was created in 2015 with data taken from 2013. Though there are many areas where there is no data seen, The areas with the highest rates are located in the Southeastern USA.

Map of Sickle Cell and Malaria in Africa

Here is an interesting article on the distribution of sickle cell anemia and malaria across the African continent. The authors of this article also details various testing instruments and measures for HIV/AIDS and other conditions.

Below is a map that illustrates the distribution of malaria and sickle cell anemia in Africa. Click on the website here to download the article!

sickle cell Africa

Source: Listick Daniel, Nanbol & Onuigwe, Festus & I.M., AbdulAzeez & B Osadolor, Humphrey & M.A.O, Okungbowa & O.J., Ikeama & Bukar, Alhaji & Emokpae, Abiodun & J.P.C., Nnadi & T, Nuhu & O.G., Ighalo & S.A., Shinkafi & Omoruyi Pius, Omosigho & Imoru, Momodu & Ikechukwu, Iwueke & Isah Ladu, Adama. (2017). SOKOTO JOURNAL OF MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE (SJMLS) VOLUME 2 ISSUE 2 JUNE 2017.

HIV Rates by Area of the USA for Adults and Children living with the disease.

CDC_elmore_hivratesbyresidence

Source

The CDC has created a map that shows the Rates of Adults and Adolescents living with a diagnosed HIV infection by the area of residence. This map was created in 2015 with data taken from 2013. Though there are many areas where there is no data seen, The areas with the highest rates are located in the Southeastern USA.

HIV Prevalence Rates in GA in 2015

AIDSVu.org has information on HIV prevalence and incidence rates and cases from all counties and states in the U.S. The information is also broken down by demographic and mode of transmission. On the national map, it appears that the southeastern and eastern regions of the U.S. made up a significant portion of the persons living with HIV in the U.S. in 2015. Some of these states included Louisiana, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, Delaware, New Jersey and New York. The site also provides information on services individuals can utilize for testing and treatment purposes.  The map below shows the rates of HIV prevalence in Georgia in 2015. According to the local data provided by the site, there were approximately 49,463 people in Georgia living with HIV at the time of data collection. To view more HIV data on specific counties in GA or from other counties and states in the U.S., click on the website, here.

Georgia-Map_cropped

Source: https://aidsvu.org/state/georgia/

Image

The NCHHSTP Atlas was created to provide an interactive platform for accessing data collected by CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP). This interactive tool provides CDC an effective way to disseminate data, while allowing users to observe trends and patterns by creating detailed reports, maps, and other graphics.

Currently, the Atlas provides interactive maps, graphs, tables, and figures showing geographic patterns and time trends of HIV, AIDS, viral hepatitis, tuberculosis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and primary and secondary syphilis surveillance data.

Learn more about the map here. Check out the map here.

Jin Lee, Intern, gis@vertices.com