CDC Map

Data Layering

On m3.mappler.net/cdcmap/ you will find information from the CDC showing a layered map of six featured categories; Demographic and Socio-Economic based on census, Demographic and Socio-Economic based on county, Mortality Rates per 100,000 people, Disease Prevalence Rates, Environmental Data, and Borders.

– Demographic and Socio-Economic (data from the census) including:
  • proportion of mobile housing
  • proportion of institutionalized population
  • per capita income
  • proportion of single parent housholds
  • proportion of housing structures with 10 or more units
  • proportion of housing with no vehicle available
  • proportion of population that is umemployes
  • proportion of population under 18
  • proportion of population that speaks English poorly
  • proportion of housing with more people than rooms
  • proportion of population in poverty
  • proportion of population over 65
  • proportions of non-white population

* US counties also have the same subcategories.

This map shows the layering of the proportion of people that are unemployed and the proportion of the population that speaks English poorly
This map shows the layering of the proportion of people that are unemployed and the proportion of the population that speaks English poorly
– Mortality Rates per 100,000 people
  • liver disease mortality rates
  • colon cancer mortality rates
  • transportation accident mortality rates
  • diabetes mellitus mortality rates
  • ischaemic heart disease mortality rates
  • stroke mortality rates
  • lung cancer mortality rates
  • alzheimers  disease mortality rates
  • cerebrovascular disease mortality rates
  • hypertension mortality rates
  • heart disease mortality rates
  • pancreatic cancer mortality rates
  • breast cancer mortality rates
  • self harm mortality rates
  • flu and pneumonia mortality rates
This map shows the layering of Colon Cancer mortality rates, Breast Cancer mortality rates, and Pancreatic Cancer mortality rates
This map shows the layering of Colon Cancer mortality rates, Breast Cancer mortality rates, and Pancreatic Cancer mortality rates

For further information, more layering, and to see the maps on Disease Prevalence Rates, Environmental Data, and Borders, visit the site !

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com

Interactive Map of Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs)

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The map, published by the Health and Social Care Information Centre, presents the annual results of the Patient Reported Outcome Measures program. This interactive map displays the patient’s opinion on the level of health benefit that they gain from four common NHS operations under different providers. Patients complete PROMs questionnaires about their health before and following surgery. One of several scoring systems used , called the EQ-5D index score, applies across all procedures, capturing different health aspects such as mobility, pain and depression. HSCIC chair Kingsley Manning said: “I am very pleased that the HSCIC is able to offer the public a new tool to make data more accessible on these key operations which thousands of patients undergo each year. “By making our published data available in a variety of formats for patients, care users, the public, clinicians, policymakers and others the HSCIC can play a powerful role in improving health and social care outcomes.”

Read the original article here and check out the map here

Jin Lee, Intern, gis@vertices.com 

The Environment and Health Atlas for England and Wales

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The Environment and Health Atlas for England and Wales is an independent publication produced by the UK Small Area Health Statistics Unit (SAHSU). The atlas provides maps of the geographical variations for a range of health conditions and environmental agents at a small-area scale (census wards) such as malignant melonama, breast cancer, nitrogen dioxide etc. The maps have been developed as a resource for those working in public health and public health policy and for the general public to better understand the geographic distribution of environmental factors and disease and to identify questions for future research. The maps aim to provide baseline information for policy makers and the public on geographic patterns of environmental pollutants and disease and to help in development of hypotheses to understand and explain variability in disease risk that may relate to the environment, lifestyle factors and/or location.

Get more information and check out the maps here.

Juhi Mawla, Intern, gis@vertices.com 

Keeping Produce Pesticide Free

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DriftWatch, a map created by Purdue University, helps pesticide applicators and specialty crop growers communicate more effectively to promote awareness and stewardship activities to help prevent and manage drift effects. Drifting is when wind and weather factors can cause pesticides sprayed in the air or ground to move off target and into other areas. DriftWatch allows farmers to mark their sensitive fields on an online map so sprayers can better identify which areas to use caution around.

Read the rest of the article here and check out the map here.

Juhi Mawla, Intern, gis@vertices.com

What’s Wrong with our Drug Pricing System?

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Access to healthcare and costs depend on where one lives in the United States. Chronic eye disease doesn’t vary from place to place. But as recent Medicare data show, the way that doctors’ treat it does, and those choices have huge effects on the U.S. and personal budgets.

The brightest reds show places where the vast majority of the money spent in treating chronic eye disease is spent on Lucentis; the deepest blues, shows places where most of the money spent treating the disease is spent on its cheaper alternatives.

Read the rest of the article and check out the maps here.

Juhi Mawla, Intern, gis@vertices.com

New York Digital Health Accelerator Accepting Applications

The New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC) and the Partnership Fund for New York City (Partnership Fund) launched the call for applications for the second class of the New York Digital Health Accelerator (NYDHA), a program that is making New York a hub for the emerging digital health technology industry.  NYDHA’s inaugural class of eight companies raised $12 million in additional capital and created over 120 jobs.

10 companies will receive $100,000 in investment capital along with invaluable mentoring from senior-level executives at leading hospitals and other providers in New York. By introducing these companies to healthcare providers, the program also connects them to potential customers. Applications for the program are due April 18, 2014.

Read the article here and visit Digital Health Accelerator for more details on applying.

Interested in applying, why don’t you try a mapping project?

Juhi Mawla, Intern, gis@vertices.com

A Polio Free Southeast Asia

Source: LA Times

Southeast Asia is officially polio free according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The region, comprising of Bangladesh, Bhutan, South Korea, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Timor-Leste,  is the fourth of six worldwide regions to earn a polio-free status. In 1995, the Americas became the first region WHO declared polio-free, followed by the Western Pacific region in 2000 and the European region in 2002.

Polio is a viral disease that affects the nervous system and often spreads through regions with poor sanitation largely affecting children under age 5. Although the WHO said 80% of the world’s population now live in polio-free regions, officials note more work is needed, especially in Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan, where the disease remains prevalent.

Read the article here.

Juhi Mawla, Intern, gis@vertices.com