EIA- U.S. Energy Mapping System

Energy maps are one of my favorite maps to look at, mainly because I think it is great seeing how the US is making steps towards clean, renewable energy. Here is a map that I found on eia.gov that shows all of the energy mapping systems in the US, from clean green energy to fossil fuels. I decided to show only the renewable energy sources on this post, consisting of biomass power plants, geothermal power plants, hydroelectric power plants, pumped storage plants, solar power plants, wind power plants, and wood power plants. On the site you can also look at the fossil fuel sites, transport and storage sites, market hubs, and administrative boundaries. Check out the map and see what is in your area! Is your area a place of more renewable clean sources, or a place that still needs to make the change? Thanks EIA for this great map!

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All information and photo from eia.gov

Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com

NRDC- Renewable Energy for America

I found this really interesting map on Natural Resources Defense Council’s website that shows existing and planned renewable energy sources across the United States. I think it is super important to look into and input renewable energy sources, and that the US should continue to be open in incorporating lasting energy efficient sources of power. I feel like many other nations are ahead of us in making the switch from non-renewable to renewable sources, so lets continue to step up! Take a look at the map and see what green energy sources are in your state or soon will be. The map shows wind, solar, advanced biofuel, biodigesters, geothermal, and low-impact hydroelectric facilitates that are currently in the US and planned to be built or operated soon. Check out the site to see the energy map for the US or take a closer look at each state on www.nrdc.org/energy/renewables/energymap.asp.

This map shows all the existing renewable sources in the US.
This map shows all the existing renewable sources in the US.

Posted by Intern Eva Gerrits. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com

CoolClimate Carbon Footprint Calculator

I think that it is incredibly important to be aware of your carbon footprint and have an idea of how much energy and resources you are using. I am a student at Rutgers and in my Energy and Society class one of our assignments was to calculate our household carbon footprint and see what we can change to lower our carbon count. One of the sites that I used was put together by The University of California at Berkeley, and can be found on coolclimate.berkeley.edu/carboncalculator. All you have to do is fill in some information in the five categories- Intro, Travel, Housing, Food and Shopping. Once all the sections have been filled out based on your personal energy usage and everyday choices, you’ll see what your total footprint is which is calculated on how much tons of carbon you use per year.

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What I liked most about this site is at the end, it gives you options as to what you can do to lower your footprint. The site gives you things you can do at no cost and options for donations to offset your emissions. Check out the site and see what you can do to have a smaller carbon footprint .

 

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. contact at gis@vertices.com

Reducing CO2 Emissions in NYC Buildings

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Did you know that the majority of New York City’s CO2 emissions comes from buildings? Not exactly what you expected from an auto-dependent city? Heating, cooling, lighting, and general operations can use a vast amount of energy. To meet the goal of reducing carbon emissions by 30% before 2030, New York City is targeting energy reduction in the city’s largest buildings. Since 2010, buildings 50,000 sq. ft. and over have been required to benchmark their energy and water use as part of Local Law 84.

The Energy Locus map was created in collaboration with Mappler and the Community Mapping Initiative, a student interest group at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers. The map includes the 2011 EPA Energy Star score for hundreds of commercials buildings in New York City that were required to comply with Local Law 84.

This map allows users to search for addresses and determine a listing’s Energy Star Score. Buildings with a score of 75 and higher indicate the facility performs better than at least 75% of similar buildings nationwide when accounting for weather and operating conditions.

Source: http://lab.mappler.net/

Juhi Mawla, Intern, gis@vertices.com