Locating HPSAs for Dental Care in Georgia using GIS

Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) or Medically Underserved Area/Population (MUA/P) are designated by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) based on HRSA’s shortage designation criteria. According to HRSA,

“HPSAs may be designated as having a shortage of primary medical care, dental or mental health providers. They may be urban or rural areas, population groups, or medical or other public facilities. MUAs may be a whole county or a group of contiguous counties, a group of counties or civil divisions, or a group of urban census tracts in which residents have a shortage of health services. MUPs may include groups of persons who face economic, cultural or linguistic barriers to health care.”

The HRSA website allows you find health related information using GIS. Information is sectioned by dental, mental and primary health, by state and even county.

Take a look at the map below to see the HPSAs for dental health care in Georgia.

 

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Source: https://datawarehouse.hrsa.gov/topics/shortageareas.aspx

Map of Dental Sites in Georgia

The Georgia Department of Public Health (GADPH) offers a plethora of resources for individuals residing in Georgia who are seeking access to dental care. One important piece of information that GADPH offers are maps of dental sites throughout all regions of GA. These maps provide locations of dental care sites that are non-profit, state and/or federally funded. Those dental care sites consist of dental schools, public health dental offices, federal qualify health centers (FQHCs), charitable organizations and dental hygiene schools.

Check out the map below!

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Please visit this website to learn more about this map and GADPH.

Source: http://www.gaohcoalition.org/care/map.aspx

Healthmap.com

Healthmap.com is a great site to quickly and easily see health alerts and information around you. When you go on the site, you can let the site access your location and immediately health alerts pop up. The picture below shows 89 alerts around central NJ this past week. Click on the data points to view more information about the disease and the location.

Stay alert & stay healthy! Thanks healthmap.com for the information. Go to healthmap.com to see more.

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Helpful Links ! Share & Post

Hey Bloggers!

I just wanted to post a view of our company’s (Vertices) sites for you guys to follow & share. As you know, or if your visiting our blog for the first time, Vertices is a GIS Consulting and App Solutions company in New Brunswick, New Jersey. We have our own mapping program called Mappler, that allows the product user to custom a community map that fits their needs. Vertices also does a lot of work with watershed organizations, schools, non-profits, and small to large scale companies. We also train product users on our Mappler application and work with various groups to jump start their community map project. If you, your company, your organization, your group, your school, or your website ever need an easy to read, easy to follow, and easy to contribute too map, CONTACT US! 🙂

We are on Twitter!

We are on Facebook!

Here are our blog pages!

Company Websites

EDF & Google Earth- Mapping Outreach for Natural Gas Leaks

I came across this really interesting new mapping initiative on the Environmental Defense Fund’s site, that maps natural gas leaks, mostly methane, in cities across the US. This outreach is a collaboration of EDF and Google Earth, which is using “specially equipped Google Street View cars” to collect information. This project is still in it’s start-up stage, so there are only a few cities but more are being added and you can also nominate your city.

The map shows the areas of methane leaks and indicates whether the leak has a low, medium or high impact on the environment. It is color coordinated and easy to understand. Seeing all the points of interest across the mapped cities of Boston, Syracuse, Staten Island, Indianapolis, and Burlington, make you think what it happening in your closet city.

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Here is the map for Boston! Check out the other cities and nominate yours! Go to http://www.edf.org/climate/methanemaps/city-snapshots or click here.

Posted by Intern Eva Gerrits. Information from http://www.edf.org. Contact gis@vertices.com

Earth Day Community Map!

Our Vertices team created an Earth Day map so everyone and anyone can share what they think makes this planet beautiful! All you have to do is go outside and snap a picture of what you think makes this planet awesome and upload it on the site.

Today on Earth Day, log onto earthdaymap.com from your phone or computer as a guest or create an account. Input your location, choose the category that best represents your photo, upload the picture (example: tree, flower, animal, insect, sunset, etc.), then add a short comment about your data. The time and date will be automatically added in by our mapping program Mappler!

Let’s see how many data points around the US and even the world we can map. So go outside and share your view of this amazing planet!

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CDC Map

Data Layering

On m3.mappler.net/cdcmap/ you will find information from the CDC showing a layered map of six featured categories; Demographic and Socio-Economic based on census, Demographic and Socio-Economic based on county, Mortality Rates per 100,000 people, Disease Prevalence Rates, Environmental Data, and Borders.

– Demographic and Socio-Economic (data from the census) including:
  • proportion of mobile housing
  • proportion of institutionalized population
  • per capita income
  • proportion of single parent housholds
  • proportion of housing structures with 10 or more units
  • proportion of housing with no vehicle available
  • proportion of population that is umemployes
  • proportion of population under 18
  • proportion of population that speaks English poorly
  • proportion of housing with more people than rooms
  • proportion of population in poverty
  • proportion of population over 65
  • proportions of non-white population

* US counties also have the same subcategories.

This map shows the layering of the proportion of people that are unemployed and the proportion of the population that speaks English poorly
This map shows the layering of the proportion of people that are unemployed and the proportion of the population that speaks English poorly
– Mortality Rates per 100,000 people
  • liver disease mortality rates
  • colon cancer mortality rates
  • transportation accident mortality rates
  • diabetes mellitus mortality rates
  • ischaemic heart disease mortality rates
  • stroke mortality rates
  • lung cancer mortality rates
  • alzheimers  disease mortality rates
  • cerebrovascular disease mortality rates
  • hypertension mortality rates
  • heart disease mortality rates
  • pancreatic cancer mortality rates
  • breast cancer mortality rates
  • self harm mortality rates
  • flu and pneumonia mortality rates
This map shows the layering of Colon Cancer mortality rates, Breast Cancer mortality rates, and Pancreatic Cancer mortality rates
This map shows the layering of Colon Cancer mortality rates, Breast Cancer mortality rates, and Pancreatic Cancer mortality rates

For further information, more layering, and to see the maps on Disease Prevalence Rates, Environmental Data, and Borders, visit the site !

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com

GIS Techniques to Track Soldier Health

The U.S. Army Public Health Command’s G-6 Directorate of Information Management/Information Technology has a small team of geographers who use maps to tell detailed stories. By taking data with spatial components and applying geographic information systems techniques- relationships, patterns, and trends can become revealed in a variety of visual formats.

Shannon Lowe, one of the three geographers with the GIS team said, “A geographic information system is a technique that integrates hardware, software and data to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage and present all types of geographically referenced data” (Hawaii Army Weekly).

During the first Gulf War, GIS technology was used to capture, manage, analyze, model and display data that tracked smoke and particulates from the Kuwait oil well fires. This information was linked to the locations and movements of Soldiers and units to determine exposures and possible health risks.

Tracking smoke particulates from fires and linking this information to the health and geographic locations of soldiers is just one way that GIS technology has been used to understand health in relationship to environmental exposures. The advancements of GIS over the years has enhanced the capabilities of its applications and arenas in which is can be used. All in all, GIS has provided individuals with invaluable tools for looking at data, interpreting it, and finding accurate answers to questions that were more difficult to answer prior.

Read the original article published by Hawaii Army Weekly.

Lisa MacCarrigan, Research Assistant, Vertices, gis@vertices.com