Radon Levels in GA

Radon is a colorless, tasteless and odorless gas that can cause lung cancer. According to the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., after tobacco. Radon is formed when uranium breaks down into radium, which breaks down into radon. Radon is absorbed by the soil and can enter homes through the foundation and well water systems. The map below shows the percentage of homes tested with radon levels 4.0 pCi/L and above. The data is from homes which volunteered to test their homes for radon.

Click on the link here to view more information about radon, radon testing and radon levels in Georgia.

 

Source: https://www.fcs.uga.edu/extension/home-radonRadon-County-Map-GA

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Locating HPSAs for Dental Care in Georgia using GIS

Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) or Medically Underserved Area/Population (MUA/P) are designated by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) based on HRSA’s shortage designation criteria. According to HRSA,

“HPSAs may be designated as having a shortage of primary medical care, dental or mental health providers. They may be urban or rural areas, population groups, or medical or other public facilities. MUAs may be a whole county or a group of contiguous counties, a group of counties or civil divisions, or a group of urban census tracts in which residents have a shortage of health services. MUPs may include groups of persons who face economic, cultural or linguistic barriers to health care.”

The HRSA website allows you find health related information using GIS. Information is sectioned by dental, mental and primary health, by state and even county.

Take a look at the map below to see the HPSAs for dental health care in Georgia.

 

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Source: https://datawarehouse.hrsa.gov/topics/shortageareas.aspx

Map of Dental Sites in Georgia

The Georgia Department of Public Health (GADPH) offers a plethora of resources for individuals residing in Georgia who are seeking access to dental care. One important piece of information that GADPH offers are maps of dental sites throughout all regions of GA. These maps provide locations of dental care sites that are non-profit, state and/or federally funded. Those dental care sites consist of dental schools, public health dental offices, federal qualify health centers (FQHCs), charitable organizations and dental hygiene schools.

Check out the map below!

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Please visit this website to learn more about this map and GADPH.

Source: http://www.gaohcoalition.org/care/map.aspx

Poverty Map- US Census Bureau

Here is another interesting map that we created using Mappler which displays the percentage of the population in 2010 that was considered below the poverty line. This information was gather from the U.S. Census Bureau. Red indicates areas where 30 to about 50 percent are considered living in poverty and blue shows areas where 0 to 10 percent are considered below the poverty line.

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“Mapping America’s Healthcare Disparities”- LA Times

I came across a map on latimes.com that maps America’s healthcare markets and ranks them based on each areas healthcare features and quality. The three feature categories are health insurance, available doctors, and poverty, and the three outcome categories are preventable deaths, avoidable hospitalizations, and recommended care. It is interesting to compare what areas in the US are more prone to poor healthcare quality and which areas seem to be on track.

This is a screenshot of the map that shows the worst to best ranked areas where residents die from preventable deaths
This is a screenshot of the map that shows the worst to best ranked areas where residents die from preventable deaths. (image from latimes.com)

Check out the map and see how your area measures up. Go to latimes.com or click here

MERS Map

Not only does our team at Vertices work with environmental groups, but we also participate in and work with individuals, groups, and organizations, with disaster relief initiatives. Currently we are working with Korean citizens on a map that provides real-time information on the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) outbreak.

Dr. Im and his team have created www.mersjido.com in order to help organize all of the information on the disease. The map uses Google Map API and our Community Mapping Platform called Mappler, which was created by Dr. Im. This site is based on citizen participatory mapping, which means the public can easily access it and are able to add information. This community map gives the people in Korea a way to view all information on MERS just by accessing the site on their computer or phone.

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www.mersjido.com is being updated by several Korean volunteers, and information is being shared on Facebook consistently. This map is a great example of how citizen participatory mapping can improve disaster management. The ability to visit the site and add/update information by using a web or mobile device, again provides the public a quick and easy way to see and add important information.

Dr. Wansoo Im, who also made NYRestroom.com in 2005, which is based on crowd-sourcing (featured in The New Yorker). Dr. Im and his team also mapped all the available gas stations in the affected US areas during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. His map was used in New York City, and surrounding areas, and by FEMA, Google Crisis Map, and the US Department of Energy during the crisis.

Contact us if you want to use Mappler for your business or project. Visit the MERS site at www.mersjido.com and check out mappler.net for more information on Mappler.

Posted by Intern Eva Gerrits. Contact gis@vertices.com. Click here to view the Korean MERS Map.

NRDC- Renewable Energy for America

I found this really interesting map on Natural Resources Defense Council’s website that shows existing and planned renewable energy sources across the United States. I think it is super important to look into and input renewable energy sources, and that the US should continue to be open in incorporating lasting energy efficient sources of power. I feel like many other nations are ahead of us in making the switch from non-renewable to renewable sources, so lets continue to step up! Take a look at the map and see what green energy sources are in your state or soon will be. The map shows wind, solar, advanced biofuel, biodigesters, geothermal, and low-impact hydroelectric facilitates that are currently in the US and planned to be built or operated soon. Check out the site to see the energy map for the US or take a closer look at each state on www.nrdc.org/energy/renewables/energymap.asp.

This map shows all the existing renewable sources in the US.
This map shows all the existing renewable sources in the US.

Posted by Intern Eva Gerrits. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com