Health Threat Zones Shown Through Maps

The Eco Health Alliance in New York looked at viruses harbored by mammals and how they meet humans. They looked at various viruses and species of mammals and determined the ranges of species and the infections they carry which they used to map the worlds “danger zones”. Check out the article here.

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By Julia Watson

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www.toxicsites.us

This interesting webpage displays toxic locations or superfund sites throughout the US based on the year it was discovered, the type of waste, the site’s hazardous ranking score, population size near the site, and race around the location. Brooke Singer and team wanted to show the areas of these superfund sites and provide a map that the community could interact with. Check the site out at www.toxicsites.us

Below is a full view of the US in 2015 and under is zoomed in on New Jersey in the New Brunswick area. Thanks www.toxicsites.us for the interesting map!

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Happy Earth Day! NYC Tree Map

Trees help city areas with reducing pollution, they help to improve health, and overall bring a sense of calm to a place known for fast-pace living. Here is a map we created on Mappler using data from the TreesCount! 2015 by the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation. This map is color-coded based on condition of the trees. 

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Looking at the density screenshot, it is interesting to view where the best versus worst rated trees are located. The photo on the left shows where the worst rated trees are, and the right shows the trees rated as the best. Lets keep adding trees to our concrete jungle! Click here to see the site.

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Copper River Watershed’s Salmon Blitz Project

Salmon Blitz was developed in 2013 to engage citizen scientists in documenting salmon habitat in the Copper River watershed.  Volunteers assist in the field and collect the data necessary to nominate stream and lake habitat for listing in the State of Alaska’s Anadromous Waters Catalog (copperriver.org)

For the protection of salmon, trout, and other anadromous fish, and for educational purposes, the CRW worked with Vertices and developed a personalized mapping tool that the community can use. Through Mappler, the community visiting the CRW in Cordova, Alaska, can now help monitor the fish population just by observing and inputting a small but of information using your phone.

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The information that you input consists of your name, about how many fish you saw, where you saw them, date, time, weather conditions, any additional information you know about the fish, what the habitat looks like, and any other observations you want to share. So go ahead and visit the CRW, learn something, and share it!

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com