Mean Arsenic Levels in Water

Here is an interesting map that Stephen, our GIS Specialist, created using water data information from the EPA. This map shows mean arsenic levels in water throughout the United Sates with blue indicating 0.01-1.00 parts per million, going up to 2.34-4.88 parts per million shown in red. Take a look and see how your area rates! This map definitely paints an alarming picture as far as water quality goes. Even more reason to spread awareness for water monitoring and environmental health education.

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information for this map is from the EPA

NYT Income and Life Expectancy Map

It seems logical that the more money you have, the longer you would be expected to live. This would be because you can afford better healthcare, maintain a healthier lifestyle, have access to better nutrition, and probably have less stress when it comes to day-to-day life because you are financially stable. The New York Times recently released an article that affirmed this thought, but also gave an eye-opening spin on the life expectancy of the poor based on where they live, showing that cities like LA and New York the life expectancy of those under the poverty line is higher then other cities in the US.

Health plays a significant role in the life span of a human, which seems obvious but when you look at the numbers, it can be shocking. The Journal of the American Medical Association states that the richest men live 15 years longer then the poorest 1 percent. So why do the poor living in cities like Las Vegas, Indianapolis, Dayton, and Tulsa to name a few, have lower life expectancies? David M. Cutler who is a economist at Harvard explains that a lot of cities with the lowest life expectancy for the poor fall into the “drug overdose belt”. Other explanations are just the availability to clinics and health education. Increasing health resources would slowly help to increase life expectancy in cities with the lowest life spans.

Take a look at the map from the NYT and see where your area compares. Looking at where you live, do you think your area provides enough health resources for those who can’t afford it?

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All information for this post is from an article by The New York Times.

 

Poverty Map- US Census Bureau

Here is another interesting map that we created using Mappler which displays the percentage of the population in 2010 that was considered below the poverty line. This information was gather from the U.S. Census Bureau. Red indicates areas where 30 to about 50 percent are considered living in poverty and blue shows areas where 0 to 10 percent are considered below the poverty line.

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Adult Obesity Map

This is a map that we created based off of data from the Center for Disease Control. This information shows the percentage of adults that were classified as obese in the year 2010. Blue indicates areas with the lowest percentages, while red shows areas where obesity in adults is more prevalent. It is interesting to think about the fact that we have so much food here in the US, yet getting a hold of healthy options is more difficult then it should be. #foodforthought

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City Population- IIED

This really interesting map on International Institute for Environment and Development’s website, iied.org, shows populations of cities with more then 500,000 people from 1800 to the predicted 2030. The visual that this map gives shows how big our world really is. With a little more than 7 billion people right now, by 2030 that amount will surely grow. Makes you think about what the health, environment, food and water situation will look like when the predicted population for 2030 will be more then 8 billion. I think that if we can increase education efforts on population rise and conservation efforts, we can help to lessen that number or at least be more prepared.

Below is a screenshot from iied.org of cities in 1800 that had more than 500,000 people. London and Beijing had more than a million and Guangzhou and Paris are between 500,000 and a million people.

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Looking at 2015, you can see that 1,029 cities had populations larger than 500,000. Take a look at their site and see what the projection is for the year 2030! Thanks IIED for the cool map!

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all information for this post from iied.org. contact vertices@gis.com. click here for the site.

The Most Distinctive Causes of Death by State, 2001-2010

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This map put out by the CDC, shows the most distinctive causes of death in the United States. This map is colored coded to be easier to read and as you can see the key below the map shows what the cause of death is. There are interesting limitations to keep in mind while looking at the map. On the CDC site they explain “A limitation of this map is that it depicts only 1 distinctive cause of death for each state. All of these were significantly higher than the national rate, but there were many others also significantly higher than the national rate that were not mapped. The map is also predisposed to showing rare causes of death — for 22 of the states, the total number of deaths mapped was under 100. Using broader cause-of-death categories or requiring a higher threshold for the number of deaths would result in a different map. These limitations are characteristic of maps generally and are why these maps are best regarded as snapshots and not comprehensive statistical summaries” (cdc.gov). To take a closer look at the map and read the background of the project go to cdc.gov

all information from cdc.gov. click here to see the site. contact gis@vertices.com.

CDC Stroke Death Rate

This CDC map displays stroke death rates from 2011-2013 in adults ages sixty-five and older. The data is taken from the National Vital Statistics System and the National Center for Health Statistics. This particular map shows all ethnic groups, and if you visit the site you can see other maps that focus on one ethnicity. Go to cdc.gov to see all the maps and to view more information !

 

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all information for this post from cdc.gov. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com.

MERS Map

Not only does our team at Vertices work with environmental groups, but we also participate in and work with individuals, groups, and organizations, with disaster relief initiatives. Currently we are working with Korean citizens on a map that provides real-time information on the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) outbreak.

Dr. Im and his team have created www.mersjido.com in order to help organize all of the information on the disease. The map uses Google Map API and our Community Mapping Platform called Mappler, which was created by Dr. Im. This site is based on citizen participatory mapping, which means the public can easily access it and are able to add information. This community map gives the people in Korea a way to view all information on MERS just by accessing the site on their computer or phone.

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www.mersjido.com is being updated by several Korean volunteers, and information is being shared on Facebook consistently. This map is a great example of how citizen participatory mapping can improve disaster management. The ability to visit the site and add/update information by using a web or mobile device, again provides the public a quick and easy way to see and add important information.

Dr. Wansoo Im, who also made NYRestroom.com in 2005, which is based on crowd-sourcing (featured in The New Yorker). Dr. Im and his team also mapped all the available gas stations in the affected US areas during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. His map was used in New York City, and surrounding areas, and by FEMA, Google Crisis Map, and the US Department of Energy during the crisis.

Contact us if you want to use Mappler for your business or project. Visit the MERS site at www.mersjido.com and check out mappler.net for more information on Mappler.

Posted by Intern Eva Gerrits. Contact gis@vertices.com. Click here to view the Korean MERS Map.

Earth Day Community Map!

Our Vertices team created an Earth Day map so everyone and anyone can share what they think makes this planet beautiful! All you have to do is go outside and snap a picture of what you think makes this planet awesome and upload it on the site.

Today on Earth Day, log onto earthdaymap.com from your phone or computer as a guest or create an account. Input your location, choose the category that best represents your photo, upload the picture (example: tree, flower, animal, insect, sunset, etc.), then add a short comment about your data. The time and date will be automatically added in by our mapping program Mappler!

Let’s see how many data points around the US and even the world we can map. So go outside and share your view of this amazing planet!

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Galveston Bay Foundation

The Galveston Bay Foundation, a non-profit established in 1987, helps to manage issues and concerns of the Galveston Bay, located along the upper coast of Texas. This estuary serves a variety of uses such as commercial and recreational fishing, and marine transportation. Also, the bay area is the petrochemical production capital of the nation, where petroleum refining occurs. In addition Galveston Bay is also a place for hobbies such as bird watching and boating, and currently half the population of Texas lives in the Galveston Bay watershed.

With all of these activities and uses, pollution is a major concern and this foundation does all they can to minimize contamination. One of the many ways that the bay is protected is through the Galveston Bay Action Network. This interactive mapping tool powered by Mappler, is a way that the public and authorities can report and view water- related pollution in the bay area. Below shows the map where you can go for information and to post findings yourself.

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If you are ever in the area and see something then report it! This interactive map is a great way for the public to interact and show concern which can lead to authoritative action. To learn more about the Galveston Bay visit- galvbay.org. To learn more about Mappler visit- www.mappler.net

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com