Antartica’s Largest Iceberg Will Soon Be Non-Existent

On its course to the equator, this massive iceberg breaking off of Antartica’s Ross Shelf is nearing destruction.

Source: https://www.livescience.com/62759-largest-antarctic-iceberg-b15-is-melting.html

The iceberg, called B-15, has been drifting away from Antartica for around 20 years, covering more than 6,600 miles. The iceberg has gradually fractured into multiple smaller sections, and the section pictured is called B-15Z.

Source: https://www.livescience.com/62759-largest-antarctic-iceberg-b15-is-melting.html

This map tracks the course of B-15Z over time, and the iceberg is now passing the South Georgian Islands. The iceberg is nearing the equator, and the warmer tropical waters will quickly melt away the gargantuan ice mass,

For more information and photos:

 

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Average Daily PM 2.5 By County in 2011

MOTD7_19_17_AvgPM252011Particulate Matter (PM) are small particles that contain microscopic solids and liquid droplets that are suspended in the air which can be inhaled and cause health effects. PM range in size, but particles less than 10 mm present the greatest threat. Some particles are emitted directly from a source such as, smokestacks, fires, construction sites, etc. and others are a result of complex atmospheric reactions [1].

Check out this map that shows the average daily PM 2.5 by county in 2011. From the graph we see a three distinct darkly shaded clusters indicating a high amount of daily exposure. The first cluster includes counties in Nevada and Utah. The second cluster includes counties within Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas and Nebraska. The third and most prominent includes counties within various southern states such as, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and North and South Carolina. In contrast, we can see states such as Oregon, Texas, California and Arizona are shaded yellow indicating a lower daily average.

By Julia Watson

 

Climate Change- How Sea Level Rise Could Change Where & How We Live

Climate change is always a hot topic, literally. With the melting of the ice caps, the unstable polar vortex which influences the jet stream, and with temperatures becoming more extreme, it is no mystery that sea level is continuing to rise. We wanted to visualize the threat of sea level rise by making a map that shows the potential projections of how our coasts in New Jersey and New York could eventual look.

nyc 1   nyc2   nyc3
We zoomed in to focus on New York City and the Northeastern part of the New Jersey coastline. We gathered the information for sea level rise from usgs.gov and then created the map using our Mappler technology. The first image is what the coast currently looks like, with the second and third images showing possible sea level rise projections. Image 2 shows sea level rise projections for 2100 if climate change continues without us taking action. This projection shows a 2m rise, with the dark blue border showing the potential new coastline. Image 3 is the worse case scenario for the year 2100, meaning that this is what scientists are projecting if again no action towards stopping or slowing climate change takes place and if the Greenland ice sheet melts. Image 3 shows a 7m sea level rise, and as you can see the land taken is massive. These maps show the scary reality that we could face if climate change is not taken seriously. You think that the population and its growth are bad now? How about when we then have to face displacement of part of the population because land where they use to live is covered in water? Take action, educate on climate change, and do your part!

To see the map and view more of the NJ and NY coast projections click here!

Happy Earth Day! NYC Tree Map

Trees help city areas with reducing pollution, they help to improve health, and overall bring a sense of calm to a place known for fast-pace living. Here is a map we created on Mappler using data from the TreesCount! 2015 by the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation. This map is color-coded based on condition of the trees. 

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Looking at the density screenshot, it is interesting to view where the best versus worst rated trees are located. The photo on the left shows where the worst rated trees are, and the right shows the trees rated as the best. Lets keep adding trees to our concrete jungle! Click here to see the site.

Good_Trees.PNG      Poor_Trees.PNG

City Population- IIED

This really interesting map on International Institute for Environment and Development’s website, iied.org, shows populations of cities with more then 500,000 people from 1800 to the predicted 2030. The visual that this map gives shows how big our world really is. With a little more than 7 billion people right now, by 2030 that amount will surely grow. Makes you think about what the health, environment, food and water situation will look like when the predicted population for 2030 will be more then 8 billion. I think that if we can increase education efforts on population rise and conservation efforts, we can help to lessen that number or at least be more prepared.

Below is a screenshot from iied.org of cities in 1800 that had more than 500,000 people. London and Beijing had more than a million and Guangzhou and Paris are between 500,000 and a million people.

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Looking at 2015, you can see that 1,029 cities had populations larger than 500,000. Take a look at their site and see what the projection is for the year 2030! Thanks IIED for the cool map!

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all information for this post from iied.org. contact vertices@gis.com. click here for the site.

EIA- U.S. Energy Mapping System

Energy maps are one of my favorite maps to look at, mainly because I think it is great seeing how the US is making steps towards clean, renewable energy. Here is a map that I found on eia.gov that shows all of the energy mapping systems in the US, from clean green energy to fossil fuels. I decided to show only the renewable energy sources on this post, consisting of biomass power plants, geothermal power plants, hydroelectric power plants, pumped storage plants, solar power plants, wind power plants, and wood power plants. On the site you can also look at the fossil fuel sites, transport and storage sites, market hubs, and administrative boundaries. Check out the map and see what is in your area! Is your area a place of more renewable clean sources, or a place that still needs to make the change? Thanks EIA for this great map!

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All information and photo from eia.gov

Click here to see the site. Contact gis@vertices.com

Chasing Ice

I’ve posted a few things about changing temperatures and human impact consequences, so I wanted to share a documentary that I recently saw called Chasing Ice. This documentary follows environmental photographer James Balog, on his passionate project to give the public visual evidence of global warming. Balog and his team decided to focus on melting glaciers, and the drastic changes that are adding to sea level rise. With the ongoing controversy on the truth of global warming, Balog knew that people needed evidence that they could see with their own eyes. Balog and team of scientists, EIS engineers, and photo assistants, traveled to Greenland, Iceland, and Alaska capturing otherwise never could be seen glacial calving. They set up timer cameras to capture images of glacier melting over a few month period and created a time-lapse video which gave the public a real look into how temperature is effecting these areas. Even though these places seem and are so far away, our daily choices effect them, and in turn will effect us in the future. Be sure to check out the documentary, which can be found on Netflix! Our impact does effect the environment, and now the argument of “not seeing” our effects, can in fact be seen and trust me it will shock you.

Screen shot 2015-03-09 at 3.57.24 PMScreen shot 2015-03-09 at 4.04.25 PMWatch the trailer here! Click here to visit the Chasing Ice website!

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Contact us at gis@vertices.com.