nj.mapplerx.com/map/urisahealth

Take a look at this interesting map we made on Mappler in collaboration with Planning Communities! The map is full of GIS layers that you can toggle to show various information such as crime, food, recreation, transit, and URISA health data in DC. The picture below shows URISA data marking sidewalks, intersections, homeless locations, and garbage. Visit the map to view all the data ! nj.mapplerx.com/map/urisahealth

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NYT Income and Life Expectancy Map

It seems logical that the more money you have, the longer you would be expected to live. This would be because you can afford better healthcare, maintain a healthier lifestyle, have access to better nutrition, and probably have less stress when it comes to day-to-day life because you are financially stable. The New York Times recently released an article that affirmed this thought, but also gave an eye-opening spin on the life expectancy of the poor based on where they live, showing that cities like LA and New York the life expectancy of those under the poverty line is higher then other cities in the US.

Health plays a significant role in the life span of a human, which seems obvious but when you look at the numbers, it can be shocking. The Journal of the American Medical Association states that the richest men live 15 years longer then the poorest 1 percent. So why do the poor living in cities like Las Vegas, Indianapolis, Dayton, and Tulsa to name a few, have lower life expectancies? David M. Cutler who is a economist at Harvard explains that a lot of cities with the lowest life expectancy for the poor fall into the “drug overdose belt”. Other explanations are just the availability to clinics and health education. Increasing health resources would slowly help to increase life expectancy in cities with the lowest life spans.

Take a look at the map from the NYT and see where your area compares. Looking at where you live, do you think your area provides enough health resources for those who can’t afford it?

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All information for this post is from an article by The New York Times.

 

Everydayhealth.com Flu Map

EverydayHealth.com posted a flu map of the United States to show flu-risk trends and predictions. You can either click on your state and county or enter your zip code to see how your area rates. The map is color coded with mild risk and predictions colored white, moving to moderate risk with a turquoise color, then leading to severe with pinks and then red as the most dangerous.

Screen shot 2015-03-30 at 11.51.34 AM“Our methodology takes into account current and historical CDC data, rising and falling interest in flu on social media and in online searches, and local and regional weather information. The flu map predicts flu severity county by county across the United States so you can plan ahead and take precautions to avoid the flu – both at home and in places where you plan to travel” (everydayhealth.com)

Go and check out the map by Everyday Health!

Posted by Eva Gerrits, Intern. Click here to see the site. Contact at gis@vertices.com